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Lahma Bil Basal (Egyptian Beef in Onion Sauce) #EattheWorld


Here we are in September for another installment of our #EattheWorld project, being spearheaded by Evelyne of CulturEatz. Here's her challenge.


This month she said, "We're exploring Egypt." And Wendy of A Day in the Life on the Farm is helping out while Evelyne is traveling. Before I get to my recipe, take a look at the offerings...

Lahma Bil Basal
Egyptian Beef in Onion Sauce

Many years ago - actually almost a decade ago from looking at the ticket photo - my boys were fascinated by the ancient Egyptians. We read books about them and watched documentaries about them. Oddly, I think I remember going to the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum in San Jose when I was about that same age.


 And it just so happened that the Tutankhamun exhibit landed in San Francisco that year...just in time for D's 6th birthday. So, naturally, we bought tickets, booked a hotel, invited my parents up, and made a birthday adventure out of it.


The night before we went to the museum, we ate at an Egyptian restaurant in the Outer Richmond where we feasted, watched a belly dancer, and the boys were able to put on some kitschy costumes. They loved it!


The following semester I taught a 6-week class at their school called Tut-Mania! We made ink out of  blackberries and wrote hieroglyphics; we made clay amulets and wrapped them up in mini-mummies; and at the end of the six-week class, we had a Nile Festival, giving thanks to the river for flooding and feasting in Egyptian-style. Our menu included...

Aish Baladi (whole wheat pita breads)
Baid Mil'on (colored eggs)
Wara' El Aghnib (stuffed vine leaves)
Tabaa Fakha Tazip (fresh fruit plate)
Tabaa M'kassarat (mixed nut plate)
Cocktail bil Goofa, Manga (juices - guava, mango)
Assir Limon (Egyptian lemonade)

So, for this month's #EattheWorld challenge, I wanted to make a completely new-to-us recipe. I settled on lahma bil basal, Egyptian beef in rich onion sauce. I also made a variation of Molokhia that I'll share soon.

Ingredients


  • 1 lb beef, sliced 
  • 1 T butter
  • 1 t oil
  • 4 to 5 onions, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 L stock (I used vegetable stock)
  • salt and pepper to taste


Procedure

Melt butter in a splash of olive oil in a large pot; I used a Dutch oven. Stir in the meat and cook until lightly browned. Add in the onions and bay leaves. Pour in the stock. Bring mixture to a boil. Cover and reduce heat to a simmer and braise for 4 hours.

After four hours, remove the cover, raise the heat to medium and cook until the sauce is reduced. You should have tender beef chunks in a thick, oniony sauce.

You can serve this with rice, pita bread or your favorite pasta. I served it with rice...and, I did make another batch of Egyptian mint lemonade, Limonana.

Comments

  1. As soon as I saw this on the list I looked it up and have been waiting for your recipe to pit it on my menu for next week. I can't wait to try it.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This looks scrumptious. Going on my to make list soon.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I bet the aromas are fantastic. I love beef and onions together. Perfect for a chilly autumn day.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Mmm, I can imagine how tender that beef must get after the long slow braise, and how delicious the house must smell. Anything with that many onions is a winner for me.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Yum! I actually grew up in San Francisco and my parents live pretty close the Egyptian restaurant in the outer Richmond. I've seen it often, but never been. I'll have to try it next time I'm in the area.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Nice to find your blog. Keep posting up!
    Im brazilian married an egyptian guy. Love your culture and food.
    Mercy gedan!

    ReplyDelete

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