Friday, May 31, 2019

Every Wine Deserves a Second Look: Warmed Brie with Mulberry Chutney + Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco di Sorbara Vecchia Modena 2018 #ItalianFWT


This month, Jennifer of Vino Travels is hosting the Italian Food Wine Travel bloggers as we explore Lambrusco. If you are reading this early enough, feel free to jump in on the live Twitter chat - Saturday, June 1st, at 8am Pacific time. Just use the hashtag #ItalianFWT so we can see your comment. Here's the list of the other Lambrusco posts...


Every Wine Deserves a Second Look

My initial post - for this month's event - was going to be the pairing of Torta Barozzi + Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro Amabile, but that wasn't as successful as I had hoped. The pairing was fine; the wine wasn't my favorite. So, I decided to try again and give Lambrusco a second look. 


I wanted to find out if there was something more serious and appealing to a wine that I previously found cheerfully fizzy yet cloyingly sweet. I read more about the different types of Lambrusco and I tracked down Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco di Castelvetro Vigneto Cialdini 2017 and Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco di Sorbara Vecchia Modena 2018. I'm glad I did!

You can read about our Third, but Not Final Lambrusco Exploration with the Lambrusco di Castelvetro Vigneto Cialdini 2017. I can honestly say that I am now a Lambrusco convert. And, given that all three of these were from the same vintner, I also see the range of the varietal. It's not the sweet frothy pour I remembered from my 20s. Well, it's not just the sweet frothy pour I remember from my 20s. This is a wine to be explored and taken seriously. Thanks to Jennifer of Vino Travels for making sure I did just that. Grazie mille, Jen.

Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco di Sorbara 
Vecchia Modena 2018

Made by the same vintner as my previous Lambrusco, this one was exactly what I had hoped - complex, aromatic, and dry. I brought this over to a dinner party as an apéritif and poured it with a warmed brie topped with mulberry chutney.

This Lambrusco was a silky delight with modest bubbles and a racy acidity. On the nose, I got florals and berries. But on the tongue, the notes were a combination of sweet, citrus, and spice. It was beautifully balanced and I am glad that I gave Lambrusco another chance.

Warmed Brie with Mulberry Chutney

I love serving warmed brie with a spiced fruit chutney. And I happened to have two pounds of organic mulberries from Frog Hollow Farm, so that's what I used. These are Pakistan mulberries and most were over two inches long. They resemble raspberries in flavor with a slightly more complex sweetness. We love them when we can get our hands on them.

Ingredients makes 1 pint jar plus a little extra
Chutney
  • 2 pounds fresh organic mulberries (substitute for 1 pound raspberries + 1 pound blackberries, if needed)
  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled and pressed
  • 1" knob fresh ginger, peeled and grated
  • 1 t ground curry powder
  • 1/2 t ground all spice
  • 1/2 t ground smoked paprika
  • 1/2 t crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 C organic dark brown sugar
  • 1/3 C vinegar (I used apple cider vinegar)
  • 1/2 C red wine
  • juice from 1 organic lemon
  • freshly ground salt
  • freshly ground pepper

Brie
  • 1 brie round
  • also needed: parchment paper, baking sheet, baguette slices for serving

Procedure

Chutney
Place all of the ingredients - except lemon juice, salt and pepper - in a large pan. Stir well to combine. Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer.


Stir frequently. Cook at a gentle simmer until the mixture turns dark, jammy and shiny. Stir in the lemon juice. Season to taste with salt and pepper. If you are going to use it immediately, set aside. If you are using it later, place in a sterilized jar and refrigerate until ready to use. Use within a week.


Brie
Preheat oven to 300 degrees F. Place brie round on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Heat for 10 minutes. The brie should be warmed. If you prefer it oozy, leave it in there for another 2 to 4 minutes.

Heap chutney on top and serve with slices of baguette.


Remember: next month I will be hosting the #ItalianFWT crew as we celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the Prosecco Superiore DOCG. Stay tuned for more about that. Cin cin.

Thursday, May 30, 2019

A Third, but Not Final, Lambrusco Exploration: Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco di Castelvetro Vigneto Cialdini 2017 #ItalianFWT


This month, Jennifer of Vino Travels is hosting the Italian Food Wine Travel bloggers as we explore Lambrusco. If you are reading this early enough, feel free to jump in on the live Twitter chat - Saturday, June 1st, at 8am Pacific time. Just use the hashtag #ItalianFWT so we can see your comment. This is actually not my official post because I decided to give Lambrusco a more serious look after this. So...this just a precursor to my actual post.

I located three bottles ahead of the event: Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro Amabile, Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco di Sorbara Vecchia Modena 2018, and Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco di Castelvetro Vigneto Cialdini 2017. We tried them in that order.

I paired the Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro Amabile with a Torta Barozzi and you can read my post that it didn't change my opinion of Lambrusco. If I had stopped there, I would have missed out on the Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco di Sorbara Vecchia Modena 2018 which I paired with Warmed Brie with Mulberry Chutney. That post will go live tomorrow afternoon.


The third bottle - Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco di Castelvetro Vigneto Cialdini 2017 - completely blew us away.


At first, I was hesitant. Just look at that bubblegum colored froth in my pour! I was expecting cotton candy. How wrong I was.


Jake's pour revealed a bright, clear ruby that almost glowed red. We found this Lambrusco bone dry with intense, but not overpowering, aromas. On the tongue there was an intriguing mix of tart fruit with a spicy earthiness. Wow. I am now a Lambrusco convert. 

This third bottle will certainly not be our last Lambrusco. I can't wait to read about the other #ItalianFWT experiences and, perhaps, get a list of wines to track down.


I paired this with grilled venison medallion, simply seasoned with salt and pepper, and a green salad with pears, dried cherries, and gorgonzola in a light vinaigrette dressing. Cin cin.

Hazelnut Rugelach #FoodieReads


I really did buy this book for its cover: The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin*. And then it sat on my nightstand for months. I picked it up a few times; each time I loved the opening scene, but didn't get much further than that. This time, I read it all in two days. Even still, I can't say that I really enjoyed it.

On the Page

As I was trying to explain this book to my family at the breakfast table, I realized it wasn't an easy answer. It's a story about four siblings - Varya, Daniel, Klara, and Simon Gold - who visited a gypsy fortune teller when they were children. She supposedly had the power to predict your death. The book follows the siblings as they live, spiraling towards the day of their predicted demise.

It's an interesting premise with an underlying question: How would knowing the date of your own death affect how you lived? Would you choose to live cautiously or recklessly? Would you embrace every adventure, or would you retreat, determined to change the future?

While I did find the prose beautiful, the story was uneven, abrupt, and ultimately depressing. And I found the sex scenes in Simon's narrative and the animal cruelty in Varya's section gratuitous and unsettling. Both of those elements detracted from those pieces, in my mind.

In the end, I would say that I liked the book, but I didn't love it. However, given that I appreciated Benjamin's writing style, I would pick up another book by her. I'll have to look up whether she has any other books yet...or if this was a debut novel.

On the Plate

Though this, admittedly, wasn't a foodie read per se, there was food and cooking mentioned. When the siblings reconvene at their mother's house, they cook together. When Daniel meets his niece, they share a Thanksgiving feast.

Kugel appeared in the story a few times during the Jewish High Holy Days. Varya and Klara chopped the apples while their mom cooked the noodles. So, I considered making that. But, in the end, my trio were asking for cookies. And my Enthusiastic Kitchen Elf agreed to help me. So, we made rugelach instead.


This tasty variation on a Jewish favorite combines hazelnuts and sugar instead of the traditional walnuts or raisins. I used what I had in the cupboard and two of my boys don't really care for walnuts anyway.

Ingredients makes approximately 4 dozen
Dough

  • 1 C butter, room temperature
  • 8 oz. cream cheese, room temperature
  • 2 C flour

Filling

  • 1 1/2 C hazelnuts
  • 3/4 C organic granulated sugar
  • 1 t ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 t ground cardamom
  • 1/2 t ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 t ground allspice
  • splash of pure vanilla extract
  • 4 T butter, melted and cooled

Topping

  • 1/4 C organic granulated sugar
  • ground cinnamon
  • 1 egg white, beaten
Procedure

To make the dough combine the butter and cream cheese in a large mixing bowl. Using an electric mixer, beat until smooth. Add the flour and, with a spatula, mix until a dough forms. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface.

Using floured hands, cut into 4 equal pieces. Flatten each piece into a disk and wrap separately in waxed paper. Refrigerate until firm, at least 2 hours or as long as overnight.

Preheat an oven to 375°F. Let the dough warm a bit to make it easier to roll out.

To make the filling, finely chop your hazelnuts. Mix in the sugar, spices, and vanilla.

Flour 1 dough disk and place between 2 sheets of parchment paper. With a rolling pin, press into a round 10 inches in diameter. Remove the top sheet, cut the round into 12 wedges, brush the dough with the melted butter, then sprinkle with the nut mixture. 

Starting at the wide end, roll up each wedge. Place on a prepared baking sheet or baking stone, arranging the cookies point-side down and about 1 inch apart.

To make the topping, in a small bowl, mix together the granulated sugar and cinnamon. Brush the cookies with the beaten egg whites, then sprinkle with the cinnamon-sugar topping.

Bake until golden brown, about 20 minutes. Transfer the cookies to wire racks to cool. Repeat with the remaining dough - filling, topping, and baking.

Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 5 days. 

*This blog currently has a partnership with Amazon.com in their affiliate program, which gives me a small percentage of sales if you buy a product through a link on my blog. It doesn't cost you anything more. If you are uncomfortable with this, feel free to go directly to Amazon.com and search for the item of your choice.



Click to see what everyone else read in May 2019: here.

Monday, May 27, 2019

Torta Barozzi + Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro Amabile #ItalianFWT


This month, Jennifer of Vino Travels is hosting the Italian Food Wine Travel bloggers as we explore Lambrusco. If you are reading this early enough, feel free to jump in on the live Twitter chat - Saturday, June 1st, at 8am Pacific time. Just use the hashtag #ItalianFWT so we can see your comment. This is actually not my official post because I decided to give Lambrusco a more serious look after this. So...this just a precursor to my actual post. It's a great cake with a mediocre wine. Or, at least, it's a wine that didn't appeal to me.

In My Glass

I'll be frank: When I thought of Lambrusco, I pictured a frothy pour somewhere between deep magenta and red. And sweet. Always sweet. So, I was excited dig deeper and take a serious look at this wine. I learned...

That 'Lambrusco' actually refers to an entire family of grapes from, mostly, the Emilia-Romagna region. And, under the Lambrusco umbrella, there are four main varieties that comprise the wines currently made: Lambrusco di Sorbara, Lambrusco Grasparossa, Lambruso Maestri, and Lambrusco Salamino. The descriptions of the grapes and resulting wines was intriguing.


Initially, I got my hands on this bottle - Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro Amabile. I researched a bit about the producer. In 1960, inspired by the success of his homemade Lambrusco being served in his restaurant in Modena, Cleto Chiarli founded the first wine-making company in the Emilia-Romagna region.

In 2001 Cleto's great-grandsons Mauro and Anselmo Chiarli, built a new winery and named it after their great-grandfather. I love businesses that continue to be family run, generation after generation. But, unfortunately, I was underwhelmed by this bottle.

It had an intense ruby color with vibrant fruit aromas. I did like the lively froth, but it was still too sweet for my liking. So, I tracked down two other bottles from them: Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco di Castelvetro Vigneto Cialdini 2017 and Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco di Sorbara Vecchia Modena 2018. I'll report back soon.

But, for now, my opinion about Lambrusco didn't really change with this tasting. It was a sweet, drinkable wine that lacked the sophistication or depth that I prefer in my wines.

On My Plate

Since the wine made me think of dessert, I decided to pair it with a cake from the town of Vignola, located just outside Modena in the region of Emilia-Romagna. Research told me it is named for one of the Vignola’s most famous sons, Jacopo Barozzi, a renowned Renaissance architect. The recipe for Torta Barozzi was first created by Eugenio Gollini in 1907 in his pasticceria, Pasticceria Gollini. Though I've never tried it before, I was intrigued by the depth of flavor in this flourless chocolate cake. I started with this recipe.
Ingredients
  • 150 g + 50 g organic caster sugar (this is a superfine granulated sugar, but not powdered)
  • 160 g peanut flour
  • 40 g almond flour
  • 4 eggs, room temperature
  • 200 g softened butter (room temperature)
  • 150 g dark chocolate chunks or chips, at least 61% cacao solids
  • 15 g instant espresso or coffee, dissolved in 2 t hot water
  • 20 g unsweetened cocoa powder
  • pinch of salt (I used a large flake salt from Sicily that was similar to Maldon)
  • 1/2 t pure vanilla extract

For Serving
  • organic whipping cream, whipped to stiff peaks
  • sliced almonds for garnish
  • Optional: decorator tip and bag
Procedure

Preheat the oven to 325° F. Prepare a baking pan by buttering it and lining it with parchment paper. Set aside.

Mix the flours with the cocoa and the pinch of salt. Set aside. 

Melt the chocolate chunks in a double boiler until smooth. Let cool for 5 minutes, then add the egg yolks. Mix well with a spatula.

In a medium mixing bowl, cream together the softened butter with 150g of sugar until lightened and fluffy. Add the mixture of egg yolk-chocolate mixture and combine with a spatula. Pour in the coffee, then fold in the flour-cocoa mixture.

In another mixing bowl, beat the egg whites until foamy. Then add the remaining 50 g of sugar. Continue to beat until you get a glossy meringue with stiff peaks.



Slowly incorporate the meringue to the chocolate mixture. Pour into prepared baking dish. Bake for approximately 25 minutes. The cake should be slightly raised and matte. Let the cake cool on a wire rack - in the pan - for at least 10 minutes before unmolding. 

Invert. Remove the parchment paper and invert again onto a serving plate. Let cool completely.

To serve, add dollops of unsweetened whipped cream. I put mine through a decorator bag, but just scooped with a spoon works as well.


The boys thoroughly enjoyed the cake. Jake and I found the wine passable. You will see my thoughts on the Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco di Sorbara Vecchia Modena 2018 for my actual #ItalianFWT post. And next month I will be hosting the #ItalianFWT crew as we celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the Prosecco Superiore DOCG. Stay tuned for more about that. Cin cin.

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Crying Tiger #BBQWeek


This week, Ellen of Family Around the Table and Christie of A Kitchen Hoor's Adventures have us sharing recipes for the grill. This is one of my favorite blogging weeks of the year! I love prepping food and handing it off to Jake to grill for me.



I'm sad that it's coming to a close. But I do have a lot of recipes to try for this summer now. Here's the final line-up.


Crying Tiger

Since I couldn't possibly let an entire #BBQWeek go with only veggies and cheeses, I am closing off the week with a simple grilled steak that gets an upgrade with a Thai-inspired spicy fish sauce. I saw some menus and people calling this 'Crying Tiger', so I am adopting that awesome name for this. It's almost so easy I'm loathe to actually call this a recipe. But you should definitely try it! I think I'll try the dipping sauce on the grilled lobster tail that Ellen, of Family Around the Table, shared (here).

Also my sauce is not a traditional Crying Tiger sauce. I added different ingredients, such as fresh ginger and soy sauce. And I skipped the sugar but sweetened with a bit of maple syrup.

Ingredients


  • 2 lbs steak (I used a grass-fed sirloin)
  • freshly ground salt
  • freshly ground pepper

Dipping Sauce

  • 1 T fish sauce
  • 1 T shrimp paste
  • 1/2 C freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1 T soy sauce
  • 1 T hot sauce (I used sriracha)
  • 1 t maple syrup
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and pressed
  • 1/2" knob fresh ginger, peeled and grated
  • 1 T fresh organic cilantro, roughly chopped

Procedure

Bring steak to room temperature. Season liberally with salt and pepper. Grill to desired doneness. Let meat rest while you make the sauce.

Dipping Sauce
Combine all sauce ingredients. I placed them all in a lidded mason jar and shook to combine. 

To serve, slice your steaks and serve with the sauce.

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Grilled Halloumi Over Hummus #BBQWeek


This week, Ellen of Family Around the Table and Christie of A Kitchen Hoor's Adventures have us sharing recipes for the grill. This is one of my favorite blogging weeks of the year! I love prepping food and handing it off to Jake to grill for me.




Grilled Halloumi Over Hummus

Whenever the grill comes out for the season, I head to the cheese case and pick up a log of halloumi. Halloumi originated in Cyprus, during the Medieval Byzantine period, and gained popularity throughout the Middle East region. The cheese is often used in cooking and can be fried or grilled until brown without melting, owing to its higher-than-normal melting point. during the summer months Cypriots eat it, grilled, with watermelon.

Since it's not quite watermelon season here, I opted for an appetizer of grilled halloumi over hummus served with toast points, capers, and pickled red onions. I just like to have a mixture of textures and flavors. In this case the halloumi is salty, hummus creamy, pickled onions tart. It's savory heaven.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 lb Haloumi cheese, sliced into blocks
  • 2 T olive oil
  • oil for grill (pan)
  • Also needed: a grill or grill pan
Serving
  • hummus (store-bought or homemade*)
  • toasted baguette slices
  • capers
  • pickled red onions (one version here)

*Hummus is a family favorite though my younger son is sensitive to garbanzo beans. But that's another story. So, here are some of our favorite versions: Roasted Beet Hummus, Roasted Carrot Hummus, Beluga Lentil Hummus, and Cauliflower Hummus.

Procedure

Heat grill or grill pan and rub with oil.

Place cheese on the grill. Use a metal spatula to scrape under the cheese before turning. Turn until evenly browned, approximately 2 to 3 minutes per side.

To serve, place a dollop of hummus on a serving plate. Arrange grilled halloumi on top. Serve with toasted baguette slices, capers, and pickled red onions.

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Grilled Eggplant, Tomatoes, and Burrata Platter #BBQWeek


This week, Ellen of Family Around the Table and Christie of A Kitchen Hoor's Adventures have us sharing recipes for the grill. This is one of my favorite blogging weeks of the year! I love prepping food and handing it off to Jake to grill for me.



Grilled Eggplant, Tomatoes, and Burrata Platter
Along with my grilled sweet potatoes and grilled spiced octopus, I wanted to serve a Mediterranean-inspired platter. And burrata is always a family favorite!


In case you are unfamiliar, burrata is a fresh Italian cheese made from mozzarella and cream. The outer shell is solid mozzarella while the inside is a mixture of mozzarella and cream. In Italian burrata means "buttered."


Ingredients
  • 1 pound organic, stem-on tomatoes, sliced in half
  • 1 T balsamic vinegar
  • freshly ground salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • 5 large garlic cloves, crushed
  • 2 organic globe eggplant, sliced into thick coins
  • olive oil, for brushing + more for grill
  • organic fresh basil leaves
  • 2 balls burrata cheese , room temperature and quartered

Procedure
Prepare a gas or charcoal grill for high heat cooking; a grill pan on the stove would also work.

Chop off the top and bottom of the eggplants and slice ½" rounds. Brush each coin generously with olive oil on both sides. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

When grill is ready, cook the eggplant until it's softened, approximately 5 minutes per side. If eggplant seems dry, brush on a little more oil while cooking. Remove from grill to a plate, tent loosely with foil, and set aside.

Grill the tomatoes until they just have a nice char on the cut side. Set aside.

Assemble dish by arranging the grilled eggplants and tomatoes on a platter. Nestle in chunks of burrata cheese. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Drizzle with olive oil. Add a few basil leaves for garnish.

Serve warm with crusty bread and a good red wine.

Maple-Roasted Beet Soup and So Much More from the Green Mountain State #Sponsored

This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of Tracey Medeiros.
I received a complimentary book for the purpose of review, but all opinions are honest and they are my own.
No additional compensation for this post was provided; this page may contain affiliate links.

When I received an email from Tracey Medeiros, asking if I might be interested in reviewing her cookbook - The Vermont Non-GMO Cookbook: 125 Organic and Farm-to-Fork Recipes from the Green Mountain State* - I agreed immediately. I am always interested in any inspiration for farm-to-fork recipes. And, truth be told, I don't know much about Vermont. So, I was excited to see what sorts of produce would be featured.
On the Page
image courtesy Tracey Medeiros

Medeiros writes in her introduction that the book "takes you on a culinary journey through the tiny villages, quaint towns, and bustling cities of our Green Mountain State to meet the people that have helped make this book a reality. ...[The] message rings forth loud and clear, 'To ensure good health, you must know where your food comes from and how it is grown. Know what is in your food!'" (pp. xxi-xxii).

The Vermont Non-GMO Cookbook is so much more than a cookbook; it shines the spotlight on the area's food producers and purveyors and the chefs who partner with them to create delicious, innovative recipes. It also includes details about seasonal produce such as heirloom tomatoes. She shares, "Don't be deterred by a tomato with cracked skin as long as your choice is not leaking juice it is perfectly fine and just as tasty as its unblemished partners. Choose tomatoes that feel heavy for their size. Take a whiff; a ripe heirloom should give off an earthy odor..." (pg. 73).

Medeiros also educates readers on the reasons to choose organic and non-GMO. I've been on that soapbox for years, so it was a treat to read someone else's take on it.

I tried a handful of the recipes and have so many more flagged! But I'll just share a few highlights of my explorations.


Footprint Farm, LLC provided a recipe for their Meatball Bahn Mi with Maple Sriracha Mayonnaise (Vietnamese Sandwich). And next to the recipe, you get to read about their background - having met in California when they were working as outdoor educators - and their farm. "Taylor and Jake make a good team; he manages the animals, monitors soil health and fertility plans, and keeps the farm's buildings and equipment in working order. She grows beautiful flowers and keeps track of finances and planting schedules. ...[They] agree that their commitment to organic farming comes from a deep desire to contribute to the long-term health and viability of their farm's soil and the people for whom they grow the food" (pg. 36).


Health Hero Farm shared a recipe for their Grass-Fed Beef Shanks Osso Buco. Located in South Hero, Vermont, owners Hannah and Eric Noel, along with new business partners Joan Falcao and Robert Fireovid, run the certified organic farm. Medeiros reports, "The owners feel that their focus on healthy soil has resulted in wonderful grass-fed beef and delectable, nutritious organic vegetables. Their goal is to demonstrate how custom grazing and agronomics can build topsoil that will absorb storm water and prevent erosion" (pg. 175).

Other recipes I intended to try...

  • Garlic Scape Kale Pesto
  • Creamy Jerusalem Artichoke Soup with Vermont Maple Smoked Cheddar Cheese
  • Moroccan Spiced Rainbow Carrot Salad
  • Honey-Glazed Pork Bellies
  • Chèvre Gnocchi with a Mushroom, Sunchoke, and Garlic Cream Sauce
  • Black Bean and Sweet Corn Salad
  • Maple Grapefruit Margarita
  • Torta con l'Uva

In the Bowl

Though I tested more than a handful of recipes, I wanted to share one that was contributed by Tracey herself and includes maple syrup since that is something I think of first when I think of Vermont. Well, at least I used to. Now, I picture a veritable garden of eden rife with spring darlings of ramps and fiddlehead ferns; summer lovelies of heirloom tomatoes, berries (what are aronia berries?!?), and currants; and colder crops of squash, roots. Plus, if I ever make it to Vermont, I already have a road map of farms to visit!

Maple-Roasted Beet Soup 
with Chèvre and Herbs
slightly adapted from Tracey Medeiros

I made a scant few changes: I skipped the garlic because I don't usually mix onion and garlic; I substituted hazelnut oil because that's what I had; and I and left out the baguette because Jake and I are trying to cut back on our bread and carb consumption. Otherwise, I think I stayed pretty true to her recipe. And I will definitely be making this again soon.

Ingredients serves 6 to 8
Soup
  • 3 pounds organic beets, scrubbed with tops reserved for another recipe
  • 1 T maple syrup + more, as needed
  • 1 to 2 T olive oil, divided
  • freshly ground salt, to taste
  • freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 2 medium onions, peeled and quartered
  • 1 quart chicken stock
  • 2 C freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 2 t fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 t fresh dill fronds
  • 1 T hazelnut oil + more for drizzling

Garnish
  • log of chèvre
  • zest from an organic orange
  • fresh herbs (I used more dill)

Procedure
Soup
Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Place the scrubbed beets in a large mixing bowl and toss them with 1 T maple syrup and 1 T olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Wrap beets loosely in foil and place them on a rimmed baking sheets. Roast until the beets are fork tender. It depends on the size of the beets, but mine usually take about an hour or so. After 30 minutes, place the onions on the same baking sheet and roast together for the remainder of the time.


When the beets are cool enough to handle, rub off the skins and coarsely chop. Chop the onions as well.

Working in batches, puree the soup in a blender or food processor until smooth. Place the puree, chicken stock and orange juice into a medium soup pot and cook until heated through. Adjust seasoning to taste with more salt, pepper, and maple syrup as needed. Fold in the fresh herbs just before serving.

To serve, ladle soup into individual bowls. Crumble in the chèvre which should melt easily. Garnish with a sprig of herbs and drizzle with hazelnut oil. Serve hot.
You may find Tracey Medeiros on the webon Facebook, and on Twitter

*This blog currently has a partnership with Amazon.com in their affiliate program, which gives me a small percentage of sales if you buy a product through a link on my blog. It doesn't cost you anything more. If you are uncomfortable with this, feel free to go directly to Amazon.com and search for the item of your choice.



I have also added this to #FoodieReads.
Click to see what everyone else read in May 2019: here.

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