Skip to main content

Pollo a la Miel + An Amontillado-Style Sherry #WinePW

This weekend, the Wine Pairing Weekend crew - #WinePW on social media - is pairing sherry with foods. Join the conversation on Twitter on Saturday, July 9th, at 8am Pacific.


A Sherry Primer
What is sherry? Yes, I did actually ask myself this when I saw that Jeff of FoodWineClick was hosting a sherry-pairing event. 

Whhhaaaatttt? I - yes, I was this ignorant! - thought sherry was just for cooking. I had no idea you could drink it...much less enjoy it. Whoops. Thanks for the chance for illumination, Jeff. So, I got to work, reading, researching, and - finally - sipping and recipe testing.


Hopefully no one is as clueless as I was. But, just in case, bear with me. Sherry is fortified wine from the southwest part of Spain; it comes in a range of styles - dry, straw-colored or sweet, mahogany-hued or somewhere in between. Dry sherries are usually served chilled while sweet sherries are served at room temperature.

Those are the basics. Now, we'll get a little bit more involved. Unlike other wines, air is deliberately introduced to sherry as it ages because air (resulting in oxidation) and alcohol determine the kind of sherry that it is.

Fino style sherry has a layer of yeast - called flor -  that floats on top of the wine. The flor prevents more air from reaching the wine and oxidizing it further. 

Amontillado style sherry is darker in color than fino and lies halfway between the fino and oloroso styles. It can be characterized by a nutty flavor.

Oloroso style sherry is fortified to a higher alcohol level and has been exposed to oxygen for a much longer time and has a rich, almost raisiny flavor and deep color. Cream sherry is a sweetened oloroso that's often served as an after dinner cordial.

The #WinePW Offerings


In My Glass...
Locally, I found an Amontillado-style sherry made by Dry Sack. Actually, I found several different kinds of sherry, though fino and cream sherries were the must abundant options.

On the nose, the strongest aromas - for me - were almonds and honey. On the palate, it had a medium sweetness which seemed tempered when it was chilled. There was a slight tanginess that felt a little like when you eat walnuts. Overall, I found it a muted, understated sip.


On My Plate...
While I was a little bit more informed about sherry wine, I still really had no idea what to serve with my sherry. Jeff shared these guidelines: "If it swims - Fino; If it flies - Amontillado; If it runs - Oloroso". Perfect! I can work with that.

Since I had decided to go with an Amontillado-style, I paired the sherry with chicken. I found a traditional recipe from the southwest part of Spain where sherry is also made. My version is slightly adapted. Slightly.


Ingredients  serves 4
  • 4 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs
  • 1 t ground cumin
  • 1/2 t ground ginger
  • 1/4 t ground coriander
  • 1/4 t ground smoked paprika
  • 1 T fresh cilantro, finely chopped
  • 1/2 C freshly squeezed lemon juice (I use Meyer lemon since we have a tree in our backyard)
  • 1 pinch saffron, steeped in 1 T hot water for 15 minutes and strained (keep the water!)
  • 1 large onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 T olive oil
  • 2 T local honey (I used some honey with honeycomb with the honey strained away from the wax)

Procedure
Place chicken thighs in a lidded container where they can lay flat in a single layer. Add the cumin, ginger, coriander, smoked paprika, and cilantro. Rub the herbs and spices into the meat. Drizzle with lemon juice and saffron water. Cover the container. Refrigerate overnight.

Remove chicken from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before you want to start cooking. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lay onion slices in the bottom of your baking dish. Place chicken, skin-side up, on top of the onions. Stir together the oil and honey and brush on the top of the chicken.

Drizzle with more olive oil. Roast in the pre-heated oven for 40 minutes, or until chicken is browned and crisp and cooked through. Serve hot.


Before serving, taste the sauce for salt or honey.


I served this with roasted potatoes and caramelized onions. Salud!

Comments

  1. On my sweet Lord your chicken looks amazing Cam! I must try! Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I too started out pretty clueless about sherry! Looks like a tasty dish you had with it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. That chicken looks fantastic! I'm a sherry novice too - mostly associating it with Frasier & cooking :)

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Jamaican Stew Peas #EattheWorld

  Here we are at November #EattheWorld event. What a year this has been! This challenge has been one that gave us some excuse for virtual travel as we've been sheltered-in-place with the coronavirus epidemic for most of 2020. So, we've been able to read about different parts of the world and create a dinner, or at least a dish, with that cuisine. This Eat the World project is spearheaded by Evelyne of  CulturEatz . Read more about  her challenge . This month, Evelyne had us heading to somewhere tropical: Jamaica. I have actually been to Jamaica, but it was almost thirty years ago...and it was just a jumping off point for the rest of our Caribbean exploration. I don't remember eating anything at all! Pandemonium Noshery: Pumpkin Rice   Culinary Adventures with Camilla: Jamaican Stew Peas  Amy’s Cooking Adventures: Jamaican Chicken & Pumpkin Soup   Palatable Pastime: Jamaican Jerk Chicken Burger   Sneha’s Recipe: Jamaican Saucy Jerk Chicken Wings With Homemade Jerk Seas

Lamskoteletten op zijn oud-Hollands for #TheBookClubCookbookCC

Here we are at April's #thebookclubcookbookCC event. It's hard to believe that we only have three more months in this year-long journey to explore - and cook from -  The Book Club Cookbook, Revised Edition: Recipes and Food for Thought from Your Book Club's Favorite Books and Authors  by Judy Gelman and Vicki Levy Krupp.* Judy, Vicki, and their publisher,  Tarcher-Penguin ,  have provided the hosting bloggers with copies of the book plus copies to giveaway each month of the project. Woohoo. Incredibly generous. This month Sarah at  Things I Make (for Dinner)  has selected  Girl With a Pearl Earring  by Tracy Chevalier.** Click to read  Sarah's invitation . She shared the recipe for Griet's Vegetable Soup, but invited us to find inspiration in any of the pages. On the Page... While the boys were playing around the lake during our week in Tahoe earlier in the month, I stayed by the fire and finished this book in one sitting. Loved it. photo by R

Pistachio Dukkah for #HandCraftedEdibles

In an effort to make all of my holiday gifts this year, we are sharing recipes for hand-crafted edibles. Over the course of twelve weeks, we'll be sharing recipes that you can make at home to give to friends and loved ones, or things to serve at holiday parties. We hope you'll follow along for inspiration. You can find out more information, including the schedule:  here . This week, we are "going nuts" and sharing all sorts of recipes with nuts. Think spiced nuts or nutty fruit cake or whatever floats your nutty boat! Here's what we're posting this week... Amy's Cooking Adventures  shared her Salted Chocolate Cashew Butter Cookaholic Wife  cooked up Slow Cooker Cinnamon Almonds Making Miracles  made Honey Roasted Almonds Christmas Tree Lane  posted Crockpot Spiced Nuts A Day in the Life on the Farm  wrote about the Easiest Nut Brittle in the World Sew You Think You Can Cook  prepared Orange Rosemary Roasted Almonds Culinary Adventur