Monday, July 16, 2018

Bagna Cauda-Bathed Egg Salad Toasts #KitchenMatrixCookingProject


Here we are at the third #KitchenMatrixCookingProject post for July. This month I picked the dishes with easy recipes to inspire some al fresco dinners. My family and I have been taking our meals outside often. On the weekends we have been eating every meal out there. And, during the week, dinners are served on the patio.


 We love the fresh air and warmer than usual evenings. 


It's a great way to spend a meal with those you love. 


Earlier we shared chicken wing recipes and gazpacho recipes; this week, I picked Hard Boiled Eggs + 12 Ways. You can read more about our project: here. We'd love to have you join us. 

The Other Eggy Offerings



Bagna Cauda-Bathed Egg Salad Toasts
Though I was intrigued by the pickled eggs (don't worry, I'll try those soon!) and we are fans of anything with curry, but I really wanted to share my favorite egg salad with bagna cauda-bathed toasts.


First: I think the best way to cook eggs is to boil them for 5 minutes, then turn off the heat completely and let the eggs cool in the cooking water.

What really makes this recipe outstanding is the bagna caudaBagna cauda, literally translated as "hot bath," this dipping sauce appears in many Italian homes as part of the Christmas feast. Traditionally it's served with cardoons (you can read a little bit about cardoons in this post), but any vegetables will do. Diners dip the cardoons into the sauce and eaten with a slice of bread held to catch the drippings. When the bread is soaked with sauce, they eat it, too. And you start all over again. It's delicious and wonderful. So, I love that this recipe gives the bread a healthy drizzle of bagna cauda.

Ingredients
Bagna Cauda
  • 1/2 C butter
  • 1/2 C olive oil
  • 20 anchovy filets (I used a 2 oz can of oil-packed anchovies)
  • 10 to 12 garlic cloves, peeled and pressed
Egg Salad
  • 12 large, hard-boiled eggs
  • 1 T salt
  • 1/2 C garlic mayonnaise (recipe below)
  • freshly ground pepper for serving
Toasts
  • 6 to 8 slices of bread
  • olive oil for brushing
  • 1 whole garlic clove, peeled
Garlic Mayonnaise
  • 2 t vinegar (I used a white wine vinegar)
  • 2 t freshly lemon juice
  • 3/4 C canola oil
  • 1/4 C olive oil
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and pressed
  • 1 t salt
Procedure


Bagna Cauda
Combine all of the ingredients in a small saucepan and cook over medium heat until the anchovies dissolve and the garlic is soft and fragrant, approximtely 5 to 6 minutes. Keep stirring so the garlic Remove from the heat and let the bagna cauda rest in the pan. Before serving, stir to recombine the ingredients.

Garlic Mayonnaise
Whisk the canola and olive oils together. Whisk together the vinegar and lemon juice. Place egg yolk in the bowl of a food processor fitted with a metal blade. Add the garlic and salt and blend until the yolk is pale yellow, approximately 30 seconds. Add a few drops of the oil and pulse to incorporate the oil into the egg mixture. With the machine running, drizzle in the 1/4 C oil slowly until the egg and oil are emulsified. Turn off the food processor, remove the lid, scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula, and pour in one-third of the vinegar-lemon juice mixture. Return the lid and pulse to combine. Repeat, adding 1/4 C oil at a time and 1/3 of the acid until you have used them all. You will end up with a thickened garlic mayonnaise.


Toast
Brush the side of the bread with olive oil and place on a griddle or grill pan until the bread is golden brown and crispy. Remove the toast from the pan and rub the oiled side of each toast with the garlic clove


Egg Salad
Tear the eggs in half to separate the whites from the yolks. Break the yolks in thirds and the whites into sixths. Place all of the pieces into a mixing bowl. Sprinkle the eggs with salt. Add the garlic mayonnaise and stir aggressively with a rubber spatula until combined. 


To Serve
Give the bagna cauda a stir and spoon 1 T on each piece of toast. Spoon egg salad onto the toasts and sprinkle with black pepper. Serve with more bagna cauda for diners to drizzle on as needed.

Food, Foodie Gossip, and a Generous Helping of Snark #FoodieReads

After having just re-read Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain*, I decided to read one of his books that I hadn't read before - Medium Raw: A Bloody Valentine to the World of Food and the People Who Cook by Anthony Bourdain*. I've had it on my shelf for years, but never picked it up till now.


And I'll preface this post with a comment: this book did not inspire me into the kitchen. So, I won't be sharing a recipe here. He did, however, serve up a generous helping of snark. 

I found this book much angrier and filled with contempt. In fact, he has a chapter entitled "Heroes and Villains"...and one called "Alan Richman is a Douchebag." I found some of it interesting, but it doesn't follow a storyline at all. It's just a series of musings on food, foodie gossip, and what he loves and hates in the food industry. Honestly, it felt like disjointed rants that he just wanted to get out of his brain and on to paper. And it's rife with name-dropping punctuated with mud-slinging. So...

Heroes: "Fergus Henderson is a hero. In the best heroic tradition, he'd be mortified to hear this. He's English, for one - and painfully modest about all the adulation. ...I've shamelessly baked in his reflected glory at every opportunity. I am a supporter, an acolyte, a devotee, an advocate for all things Henderson. I am a True Believer" (pp. 143-44). Wylie Dufresne and Grant Achatz rate as heroes in his book, too.

Villains: "Brooke Johnson, the head honcho at Food Network, is a villain. That's an easy one. But she's a villain for being right - not for the cynical, fake-ass, soul-destroying, lowest-common-denominator shit-shows she's nurtured and supported since taking the helm. ...On her watch, the network's audience has exploded. ...And for that, and the fact that she couldn't and probably shouldn't give a shit whether she's a villain or not - she's a villain" (pp. 150-51). Alain Ducasse and the James Beard House rank as villains.

He details what he labels as Alice Waters' hypocrisy and he says, "What  makes Alice Waters such a compelling character is her infectious enthusiasm for pleasure. She's made lust, greed, hunger, self-gratification, and fetishism look good. When Alice shows you a bunch of radishes, you fucking want them. Where have those radishes been all my life? I need them!" (pg. 140).

Despite what I would consider excessive and unnecessary profanity in this Bourdain book, he certainly has a way with words. So, I'll keep reading his books...and regretting that the man who wrote the words is no more because I have a sense he had more to say.

*This blog currently has a partnership with Amazon.com in their affiliate program, which gives me a small percentage of sales if you buy a product through a link on my blog. It doesn't cost you anything more. If you are uncomfortable with this, feel free to go directly to Amazon.com and search for the item of your choice.

Here's what everyone else read in July 2018: here.

Coffee-Infused Wine? One Sip Melted My Skepticism


Last week a friend posted a photo of this bottle of wine. She didn't actually tag me - she tagged someone else - but I was intrigued. So I located a bottle at my local BevMo and commented that she should come over for dinner to try it. Done.

I'll be honest: I was dubious. I like wine, but I like good wine and this seemed a little too gimmicky to me. Why would I need to drink wine infused with cold brew coffee?!? 


Denise joked, "Do we drink it in the morning? Or at night?" We went for late afternoon.

Okay, so you know I love wine. And you probably know I adore coffee. But I had some reservations about mixing the two together. My skepticism, however, was completely washed away the moment I took the first sip.


The aroma from the glass is strongly of coffee, but not a bitter coffee; think of your favorite fruity coffee bean! On the tongue, it's a subdued red wine that verges on sweet, but not Port or dessert wine sweet. Just less tannic than other reds. In any case, my fears of two rights (red wine and cold brew coffee) making a wrong (coffee-infused wine) were completely unwarranted. I think we all enjoyed this.


I served smashed potatoes with bleu cheese, grilled wild board sausage with mustard, and a fusion entree of  harissa-spiced kofta on top of mini pita with chimichurri on top. Yeah, yeah...that all sounds weird, right? But so does coffee-infused wine! And it all worked.


I will be posting recipes for these dishes soon. Stay tuned!

Salmon Burgers with Roasted Tomatillo Cream and Fresh Corn Salad #GirlCarnivore #BurgeroftheMonth


Welcome to the second Burger of the Month event hosted by Kita of Girl Carnivore. Each month, she will be sending out a list of secret ingredients to inspire a new burger recipe. What delicious, carnivorous fun!

This month's line-up needed to include: corn, tomatillos, salmon, and Old Bay Seasoning.

Just a reminder...last month, someone asked, "Do we need to incorporate all the ingredients? Or do you need to include just one of the ingredients?" The answer - yes, the challenge is to use all of them in your recipe, but they can be toppings, or accoutrements to the burger, so you can get all the components in a single bite.



I was immediately thinking of some burger form of a low country seafood boil, but couldn't really
figure that one out. Kelly of Wildflour's Kitchen Cottage fried the tomatillos and placed the salmon patty on a Southwestern-style cornbread muffin. Genius! Sean who is lucky enough to barbeque for a living in Pennsylvania made homemade Salmon spread for the "cheese" on the bottom, seasoned his burger seasoned with an Old Bay dry rub and topped it all with a smoked tomatillo and grilled corn salsa. Deanna from Seduction in the Kitchen posted a Mexican Salmon Burger that was topped with a delicious looking slaw. Yum.

Salmon Burgers with Roasted Tomatillo Cream 
and Fresh Corn Salad

I decided to skip the bun - at least for me and Jake - hand chop some fresh-from-the-bay salmon, and fold roasted tomatillos into an unsweetened whipped cream as a topping. As for the corn element, raw kernels tossed with an easy herb dressing created my base. Yum. I also mixed in local sea bass as I had some from our CSF (community-supported fishery) Real Good Fish and needed to cook it, too.

Ingredients

Salmon Burgers
  • 1 pound salmon fillet
  • 1 pound sea bass (or use 2 pounds salmon if you wish)
  • 1/4 C diced organic red bell pepper
  • 1 t Old Bay seasoning + more for sprinkling
  • butter for cooking

Corn Salad
  • 2 to 3 ears fresh corn
  • 1/4 C diced organic red bell pepper

Herb Vinaigrette (makes extra!)
  • 1 t minced fresh garlic
  • 2 t minced fresh shallot
  • 2 T chopped fresh herbs (I used a mixture of cilantro, thyme, and parsley)
  • freshly ground smoked sea salt and flower pepper
  • 1/4 C unfiltered apple cider vinegar
  • 1 1/2 C olive oil

Roasted Tomatillo Cream
  • 1/2 C organic heavy whipping cream
  • 2 to 3 T Roasted Tomatillo Salsa (recipe below)

Roasted Tomatillo Salsa (makes extra!)
  • 10 tomatillos 
  • 1 jalapeno
  • 1 whole onion, peeled and quartered
  • freshly ground salt, to taste
  • freshly squeezed lemon juice, if needed


Procedure

Roasted Tomatillo Salsa
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Lay the tomatillos, jalapeno, and onion on a parchment or silicone-lined baking sheet.


Roast until the tomatillos are soft, the onions beginning to caramelize, and the pepper is wilted, approximately 55 to 60 minutes. Let cool slightly.


Place all of the ingredients into a blender or food processor.


Blend until smooth. Season to taste with salt. If your salsa needs some tang, squeeze in the lemon juice.


Salmon Burgers
Remove the skin of the salmon and any bones and chop into 1/4" chunks. Do the same with the sea bass. Combine ingredients in medium bowl, mixing well. Once everything is combined nicely, form into six 1" thick patties. Melt butter in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add salmon patties. Sprinkle a bit more Old Bay onto each side of the burger as you cook them. Cook until just firm to touch and brown and crusty, approximately 3 minutes on each side.

Herb Vinaigrette
Place all ingredients for the dressing in a mason jar. Shake till emulsified. Dress the salad right before serving.


Roasted Tomatillo Cream
Whip cream into medium peaks. Fold in roasted tomatillo salsa to taste; I used about 2 T for ours.



To Assemble
Toss the herb vinaigrette into the corn and red bell peppers. I only used about 1/3 of the dressing. Keep the rest for another salad!

Place the cooked patty on top of the corn salad. Add a dollop of tomatillo cream on top of the burger.


Enjoy!! And stay tuned for our August burger challenge soon.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

You're Invited: Crisp White Wines from Spain and Portugal #WinePW

Since we've wrapped the July Wine Pairing Weekend, where we explored lesser known wine regions with Wendy from A Day in the Life on the Farm, I'm extending an invitation to the 51st event next month. Yep, we have been at this for a good long while Wow. So grateful to David at Cooking Chat for starting this group and for each and every blogger who pairs and posts. I learn something new every month. You can check out the list of past - and upcoming - events here.

In any case, I'm giving you plenty of lead time to play with different options as you uncork, pour, taste, and pair crisp white wines from the Iberian Peninsula. We have just under a month to plan, execute, photograph, and write!

You're Invited...

Last summer when friends from Spain returned to California, they gave me this bottle of Albariño when I had asked about the varietal. Albariño is a native Spanish grape grown mainly in Rías Baixas. As it's a region renowned for oysters, mussels, clams, and other ocean delicacies, I thought it would pair nicely with the abalone. It did! You can read my recipe for that here. And, since then, I've wanted to explore that grape and region more. So, I decided to rally the #WinePW bloggers and really dig in.

Crisp white wines from Spain and Portugal are dynamic and food-friendly. I like to think of them as enveloping your nose with summer blossoms while your tongue feels the salinity of a fresh ocean breeze.

The main grapes I can think of in Spain - for this topic - would be Albariño, Macabeo, Verdejo, Garnacha Blanco, and Treixadura. From Portugal, I'd suggest looking for Alvarinho, Avesso, Loureiro, Arinto, Fernão Pires and Verdelho.

For pairings, I would lean toward ceviche-style dishes or an array of other seafood tapas. But, they complement pork and chicken dishes just as easily. Can't wait to see the creativity from this group.


And, in the spirit of creativity, it would be interesting to compare an Albariño from Rías Baixas and one from, say, California! I found a surprising number of my favorite local vintners making Albariños. So, while the topic is crisp white wines from Spain and Portugal, I'll readily welcome any posts and pairings featuring those Iberian varietals...regardless of where the wine is made such as the winery near Jane of Always Ravenous that uses Touriga Nacional in a blend. Wait! That's a red wine grape. Okay, maybe I'll be really flexible in this event because wines from Spain and Portugal are fascinating. ¡Salud!

What will your pairing be? 

Details for participation
Are you ready to jump in and participate in the ninth #winePW? Here are the specifics…

Send an email to tell me you're in: Include your blog url, Twitter handle, link to your Pinterest profile, and any other social media detail. If you know your blog post title now, include that...but you can send me that a bit closer to the event, I'd like to get a sense of who's participating and give some shoutouts and links as we go. The email is constantmotioncamilla AT gmail.com.

Send your post title to me by Monday, August 6, to be included in the preview post. I will do a preview post shortly after getting the titles, linking to your blogs. When posted, your title should include "#winePW " (Note: I'd like us all to use the hashtag in the title to make it easier to see the posts getting shared on Twitter).

Publish your post between 12:01 a.m-7:00 a.m. EDT on Saturday, August 11. You can always schedule your post in advance if you will be tied up around then.

Include a link to the other #winePW participants in your post, and a description of what the event is about. I'll provide the html code you can easily put in your initial post--which will link to people's general blog url--then updated code for the permanent links to everyone's #winePW posts.

Get social! After the posts go live, please visit your fellow bloggers posts' to comment and share. I'll follow-up later with some specific strategies for that social sharing.

Sponsored posts OK if clearly disclosed. Please be sure to disclose if your post is sponsored or if you are describing wine or other products for which you have received a free sample.

Live #winePW Twitter Chat August 11, 11 a.m. ET: Participating bloggers and others interested in the subject will connect via a live Twitter chat. It's a nice bring way to bring in others interested in the subject who didn't get a chance to share a blog post. You can definitely still join the blog event if you're not available for the live chat.

Friday, July 13, 2018

A Few Firsts with the Infinite Monkey Theorem: From Colorado + From a Can #WinePW


This month, the Wine Pairing Weekend crew is posting with Wendy from A Day in the Life on the Farm at the helm. She asked us to discuss American wines from under the radar regions. Read her invitation here.

Living on California's central coast, I'm surrounded by wine regions. Surrounded, I tell you. I can probably drive for an entire day in any direction and still find vineyards. I actually didn't think that anywhere in California, Oregon, or Washington would qualify as 'under the radar'. And, to be honest, when I popped into a few local wine shops in search of some out-of-the-way areas, I encountered some resistance from the stores. "You know we have great wines made right here. Why don't you try something local?" Trust me, I'm a mostly local gal, but I need something from a lesser known area. "Oh...."

So, I hopped online and tried to locate a wine from Hawaii - and did find a Pinot Noir from Volcano Winery - but it wouldn't arrive in time for this event. Same thing for Alaska.

When that didn't work, I went to my local BevMo! and had them search by region for me. Strangely the wine I picked came up as Colorado-based in their computer system, but on the packaging it reads Texas. Regardless, I have never had a wine from either Colorado or Texas. I'm sure my blogging pal Michelle of Rockin Red Blog, who is based in Texas, is positively bristling that I am labeling Texas as 'under the radar.' Sorry, Michelle!! How 'bout if I clarify as 'under my radar'?!?!

Time for more confessions: I have also never had wine in a can. I barely drink beer from a can, so there are a couple of firsts wrapped up in this post for me. First wine from Colorado (or Texas); and first wine in a can. Their website states: "The Infinite Monkey Theorem is an urban winery operated by one mad scientist working out of a back alley in the RiNo Art District of Denver and SoCo District of Austin. So, I guess it's both! But before I get to my pick...and my pairing, here's what the rest of the #WinePW crew is posting...

Under the Radar

About The Infinite Monkey Theorem

When I put this on the table, Jake thought it was beer. "Beer in a can?" he asked. No, wine. "Wine in a can?!" he said, incredulously. Yes, wine in a can.

The Infinite Monkey Theorem states that "a monkey hitting keys at random on a typewriter for an infinite amount of time will almost surely type a given text, such as the complete works of William Shakespeare." We talked about that for the duration of dinner...and beyond. "Infinite," says R, "is the key." It has to be true since there are no limits. Hmmm...
The label says it’s a Merlot, but it seems to drink more like a Pinot Noir. I love that it's lightly carbonated as well. I know it is supposed to be enjoyed from the can, but I couldn't get much of the aroma that way. On the palate, it's bursting with red fruit and a hint of spices. It was surprisingly delightful. Jake even asked when I was going to pick up more. Okay!

Lamb Steaks with Chimichurri

I poured the wine with grilled lamb steaks topped with chimichurri and a mango-tomato salad.


Ingredients
Lamb
  • 4 lamb steaks (we like bone-in), approximately 1" thick
  • freshly ground salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • olive oil
  • also needed: grill pan or grill
Chimichurri
  • 1/4 C parsley
  • 3 T red wine vinegar
  • 4 large garlic cloves, peeled and pressed
  • 2 T oregano leaves
  • 1 t thyme leaves
  • 2 t crushed red pepper
  • 1/2 C olive oil
  • freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • freshly ground salt, to taste
Procedure
Chimichurri
In the bowl of a food processor, combine all of the ingredients except the olive oil, salt, and pepper. Process until smooth, drizzling in the oil until desired texture; season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer to a bowl and let stand for, at least 30 minutes. If you are making this ahead of time, place in a lidded jar and keep in the refrigerator.

Lamb
Let lamb come to room temperature and season liberally with salt and pepper on both sides. Heat grill pan over medium-high heat until hot. Brush steaks with olive oil. Grill lamb, turning once, approximately 12 minutes total for medium doneness.

Looking Ahead
If you're interested in our future topics, check out the line-up on Cooking Chat. I'll be hosting next month as we explore Crisp White Wines from Spain and Portugal. Stay tuned for more information about that event.

Tarte Flambée #BastilleDayRecipes


Today, I asked the Festive Foodies to join me in an event for Bastille Day. Bastille Day is celebrated on July 14th each year and, in France, is simply called La Fête Nationale, literally “the national celebration” or “the national party.” It might also be referred to as Le quatorze juillet, meaning ‘the fourteenth of July.”

Bastille Day commemorates the storming of the Bastille and, in a very abridged and simplified explanation, the beginning of the revolution that brought the end to French feudalism. When the kids were smaller, I explained that it was sort of like Independence Day in France. I know that’s not completely accurate, but they understood it. “Do they have fireworks, too?” one of the boys asked. Yes!

So, as most of our country is celebrating Independence Day with a bevy of American foods such as hot dogs, hamburgers, potato salad, and coleslaw, we usually head on a virtual trip, via tabletop, to France to honor their Bastille Day.

The Bastille Day Line-Up



Tarte Flambée
As part of my Alsace wine pairing dinner, I decided to serve my version of a Tarte Flambée with Pfister Gewurztraminer Tradition 2013. The Gewurztraminer was a little bit on the sweet side by itself, but with this dish, it was perfect! A note: I've heard people describe this as a pizza; mine is more of a pie crust. You can see I served this with escargot, another French dish!

Ingredients makes 1 large (9" x 13") tarte


Crust
  • 2 C flour
  • 3/4 C butter, very-cold, cut into 1/2 inch cubes
  • 2 T ice water
  • 2 T gin (typically I use vodka in a crust, but I didn't have any)
  • 2 T crème fraîche
  • 2 T ricotta

Toppings
  • crème fraîche
  • 8 strips smoked bacon, finely chopped
  • 1 medium white onion, thinly sliced (I use a mandolin slicer)

Procedure 

Crust
Place the butter cubes and flour in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse briefly, then add in the water and gin. Pulse until it begins to come together. Add in the crème fraîche and ricotta. Pulse just a few times and turn the dough out onto a piece of parchment paper. Knead just until it comes together into a ball.

Wrap the dough in plastic and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. During the last 15 minutes of the dough chilling, preheat oven to 500° F with the racks in the center position.

Roll the dough out between 2 pieces of parchment paper. Place the dough and parchment on a baking sheet or stone. Parbake for 5 minutes.

Assembly
Spread crème fraîche over the parcooked dough, leaving a 1⁄2" border around edge. Layer the top with thinly sliced onions and chopped bacon. Place in the oven and bake until crispy, approximately another 9–11 minutes.

Once cool enough to slice, cut into squares.

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Mid-Week Murrieta's Well Wine Tasting #Sponsored

This is a sponsored post written by me in conjunction with a virtual wine tasting event hosted by 
Snooth for Murrieta's Well Winery. Wine samples were provided for this post and this page may contain affiliate links.

When I received an email from a contact at Snooth about taking part in a virtual wine tasting, I was intrigued. First, because I was completely unfamiliar with the winery - Murrieta's Well - itself and, second, because I can't think of any other wines that I've tried from Livermore. I always love learning more about a new-to-me area. Besides, I love an excuse to have friends over for dinner. 

At first I was hesitant to ask Jenn because it was mid-week, but with the boys out of school anyway, she said it wasn't a problem. I told her that I had the wines and would make dinner if she could bring kid-friendly drinks and popsicles for dessert. Done.

We had a few technological difficulties logging into the virtual tasting from cell phones, but eventually I connected from my kid's laptop and set it up on a stool next to us as we poured, tasted, and ate. I'll admit: it was challenging to pay attention to the online discussion, type in my comments, and enjoy the dinner all at the same time. I'll have to figure out how to manage that better next time.

In any case, the tasting consisted of five Murrieta's Well wines...


Sauvignon Blanc 2017, suggested retail price $35
The Whip 2016, suggested retail price $26
Dry Rosé 2017, suggested retail price $30
The Spur 2015, suggested retail price $35
Cabernet Sauvignon 2015, suggested retail price $58

Sauvignon Blanc 2017

Grown from descendants of the original Chateau d’Yquem cuttings that were planted in the late 19th century, this Louis Mel vineyard is part of the original parcel that was purchased when Mel moved to the Livermore Valley. Featuring gravelly soils, the vineyard is ideal for growing Sauvignon Blanc. And being fermented in neutral French oak barrels, the wine to didn't have any oak qualities to it. It was fresh with layered, balanced acidity. 


David at Cooking Chat paired it with pesto while I opted to pair the Sauvignon Blanc with marinated chevre cheese with thyme and green peppercorns. Also on the plate were green olives, sliced bread, and a golden beet spread. When we moved on to the next wine, Jake asked if he could just stay with that one. That's high praise coming from someone who normally steers clear of white wines.

The Whip 2016

Next I opened The Whip. Comprised of 33% Sauvignon Blanc, 24% Semillon, 21% Chardonnay, 12% Orange Muscat, and 10% Viognier, The Whip is a lavishly textured wine with huge aromatic appeal. Our Snooth host used the word "perkiness" to describe this wine. I concur. It was surprisingly perky.


Vino-Sphere shared a pairing of North Carolina lump crab cake with snow pea pods. Tales of the Cork shared, "Love the combo of SauvBlanc, Semillon, Chardonnay, Orange Muscat & Viognier. Fabulous floral aromatics, crisp finish—amazing depth." This was delightful and a great match for my Boquerones Asparagus Salad.

Dry Rosé 2017

After The Whip, we moved on to their Dry Rosé, a blend of 42% Grenache, 39% Counoise, 19% Mourvedre. This one was so lovely - to the eye, the nose, and the tongue. Each varietal was cold-fermented separately to preserve the flavors of the grapes, then blended. 


Wine Compass described this one as "luscious, creamy strawberries, depth, mint, dry healthy acids." Texas Wineaux posted "Dry, crisp & refreshing palate. Strawberry, White Peach, minerals. Highly Recommend!" And I was excited to see that winemaker Robbie Meyer recommended it with salmon. Whatdya know?!? I did pair it with salmon. Well...Tomato Salad with Parsley and Shallots and Olive Oil-Poached Salmon Bellies with Olive Oil-Poached Salmon Bellies with Summery Peach-Tomato Salsa.

A quick note: we were so enjoying our three chilled wines and eager to pour the Cabernet Sauvignon with the grilled filet mignon that we accidentally skipped The Spur. So, you'll see another post with a pairing later. Whoops.

Cabernet Sauvignon 2015

All the varieties in this wine - 87% Cabernet Sauvignon, 11% Petit Verdot, and 2% Malbec - were grown in the Sachau Vineyard located behind the historic tasting room. Winemaker Robbie Meyer described it as fruit forward with woodsy aromas. There was so much going on in this wine from chocolate to olives and, yet, I would still call it supple and subtle. 'Impressive' is a word that comes to mind. At the end of the dinner, we had polished off this bottle and the Dry Rosé.


I served the Cabernet Sauvignon with some grilled filet mignon and a roasted fennel spread from farmer Jamie at Serendipity Farms


Multiple wines, multiple pairings. So much fun. Jenn, Mike, Jake, and I chatted about the small-batch blends, the terroir-driven wines...and how soon we could get sitters and make a day-trip out of a visit to the tasting room. Soon, we hope!


Find the Sponsors...
Murrietta's Well on Facebook, on Twitter, on Instagram
Snooth on Facebook, on Twitter, on Instagram

*Disclosure: I received sample wines for recipe development, pairing, and generating social media traction. My opinions do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the organizer and sponsors of this event.

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