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Supplì al Telefono + 2015 Dineen Vineyard Heritage Red Wine #WinePW

 This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of Dineen Vineyards.
Complimentary wine was provided for this post and this page may contain affiliate links.
However, all opinions expressed here are my own. 

I used to purchase Supplì al Telefono from my neighborhood rosticceria in Rome probably more often than I should admit. They're delicious and easy to eat while on the go. And I was always on the go in those days. Around other parts of Italy, they are called Arancini or 'little oranges.'

Supplì al Telefono, literally means supplì 'to the phone.' Odd name, perhaps, until you think back to the days when phones had cords. Yes, younguns, phones used to have cords! Inside the supplì are molten bits of mozzarella cheese; when you bite into them and pull away, the melted cheese is long and stringy, resembling a telephone cord. Like this... 

Supplì is a great dish to use up leftover risotto. Use whatever risotto you have on-hand. But first I want to talk about this wine.

In My Glass

Next month the Wine Pairing Weekend bloggers are working with different wineries to showcase the wines of Washington state's Yakima Valley. And I received a selection of wines from Dineen Vineyards,* including their 2015 Heritage Red Wine

I was able to spend some time on a Zoom call with Marissa Dineen, Owner, and Amanda Conley-Bagge, Dineen Vineyards' Tasting Room Manager. With the on-going pandemic and shelter-in-place orders, this seems to be a way we are all connecting. Obviously it's not the same as tasting wine with them in person, but it was so informative and so much fun. When Jake and I make it to the Yakima Valley, I will be stopping there for sure! I will share more information about the vineyards for the #WinePW event. For now, I'm focusing on the wine and my pairing.

This red wine blend is comprised of 40% Cabernet Sauvignon, 40% Cabernet Franc, and 20% Merlot. It was aged for 24 months in 50% new French oak and 50% once-used French oak which lends this a nice roundness and depth. With a limited production of just 125 cases, this is a special wine. To the eye, the wine pours a deep garnet hue with flecks of purple on the rim. On the nose there are notes of blueberries at the front, but beneath are more surprising aromas of rosemary, pepper, and vanilla. This is a medium-bodied wine with a lot of intense flavors. I tried it with a second savory pairing and even one sweet  pairing. That it worked well with all of those shows just how food-friendly this wine really is.

In the Bowl

I started this post with what supplì is. Now I'll show you how we make it. I was grateful for my Kitchen Elves who pitched into make them for me. It's simple and a great way to use up leftovers. I had some mushroom risotto in the fridge that was perfect for this recipe.

Ingredients makes 12

Supplì 

  • 4 to 5 cups leftover risotto, chilled
  • 12 ciliegie (fresh mozzarella is traditional and gives you that nice 'string') 
  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs, or traditional breadcrumbs
  • Also needed: baking sheet, parchment paper or silicone mat
Sauce
  • 2 cups passata di pomodoro or tomato sauce
  • 1 Tablespoon dried basil
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 3 to 4 cloves, peeled and minced 
  • freshly ground salt
  • freshly ground pepper
Procedure

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone mat.

Take a handful of cold risotto and flatten slightly. Press one cheese cube into the center. Cover the cheese with more rice and roll into a ball form. Dip the ball into flour, shaking lightly to remove any clumps.


Coat the ball with beaten eggs and, finally, roll the ball in the bread crumbs. Place the coated ball onto the prepared baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining risotto until all of the risotto has been used.


Bake for 22 to 24 minutes or until golden brown and crisp to the touch. While they are baking, make the sauce.

Sauce
Place the passata di pomodoro, basil, oregano, and garlic in a small sauce pan. Bring to a simmer and reduce till slightly thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.


To serve, spoon some sauce into the bottom of an individual bowl. Place the supplì on the sauce and serve immediately.

Find Dineen Vineyards on the web, on Facebook, on Instagram

*Disclosure: I received compensation in the form of wine samples for recipe development and generating social media traction. My opinions do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the sponsor.

Comments

  1. I haven't gotten my wines yet but I am anxiously awaiting them.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I can't wait to make this dish. My kitchen elf isn't quite that age but I am hoping he will eat one. The wine sounds like it was divine and can see it's appeal with this fun dish.

    ReplyDelete

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