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Mexican Street Corn Shrimp Pasta #IncredibleOnePotCooking #Sponsored

This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of author Megan Marlowe and publisher Page Street Publishing.
I received a complimentary book for the purpose of review, but all opinions are honest and they are my own.
No additional compensation for this post was provided; this page may contain affiliate links.

Last week I received an advance copy of a cookbook by a fellow blogger: Megan Marlowe of Strawberry Blondie Kitchen. Her new book is entitled Incredible One-Pot Cooking: Easy Delicious Recipes for Exciting Meals - Without the Mess.* Megan and I have blogged in similar circles for a few years, participating in virtual events for #BrunchWeek, #ChristmasSweetsWeek, and she joined my #FreakyFruitsFriday last October. So when I saw the post that she had published a cookbook and was sending copies out to bloggers for review, I jumped at the chance. I am always eager to bolster fellow food bloggers' books and projects.

On the Page

Marlowe is a busy mom of two and created sixty recipes that are tasty, filling, and won't leave your kitchen in a stack of dirty pots and dishes. The cookbook is divided into five sections: Coop'd Up in One Pan, Meaty Classics with Easy Cleanup, Comfort from the Docks, Clever One-Dish Pastabilities, and No-Fuss Soups. I dove into each section and immediately tagged seven recipes I wanted to try. But with the current shelter-in-place order in California, I needed to pick recipes for which I had all of the ingredients on hand. Raw, frozen wild-caught shrimp for the win! So, I made her Barbecue Shrimp with White Cheddar Grits, General Tso's Shrimp Po'boy, and the recipe I'm sharing today - Mexican Street Corn Shrimp Pasta.

I will say that, as a cook, I put less of a premium on only using one pot. So, I used a couple of pots to cook ingredients simultaneously. As an example, for the Mexican Street Corn Shrimp Pasta, Marlowe cooks the corn in the pot and transfers it to a plate. Then cooks the shrimp in the same pot and transfers them to a plate to use the same pot for the pasta and sauce. 

I cooked the pasta separately to speed up the process. So, our dinner was on the table in less than 30 minutes. Transferring and waiting for that one pot would add, at least 15 more minutes. You just need to decide if speed or fewer pots is your goal. But I found all of her recipes inspired and inspiring. I'll be making more of them soon.

Other recipes that will be made as soon as I can are her Peanut Butter and Jelly Wings, Deluxe Cheeseburger Sloppy Joes, Goat Cheese Macaroni and Cheese, and Beefy Peanut Butter Chili. Every recipe in this book is creative and comforting. Marlowe provides a short story that explains why she's sharing the recipe. The photos are delectable; it makes you want to reach right into the page with your fork. And her recipes are easy to follow with both volume and weight measurements. This gem will surely stay within arm's reach of my kitchen.

Though the book isn't officially out yet, you can pre-order it. I've included a link at the bottom of this post. I promise, this will be a cookbook you use again and again.

Mexican Street Corn Shrimp Pasta 
very slightly adapted from Megan Marlowe's cookbook

I opted to share this recipe because there were two major surprises for me on this culinary adventure. First, my husband offered to help me make dinner. That never happens. After I heckled him twenty-two years ago, for serving me Hamburger Helper with canned green beans, he rarely sets foot in there if I'm cooking. But he stood there and flipped the shrimp with chopsticks for me while I prepped everything else.


Second, I thought I would have leftovers for lunch today. Nope. They practically scraped the pan.


Needless to say, they have requested this again. Soon, I promise! 

Ingredients serves 4 to 6

I made some minor adaptations in that my frozen shrimp were not precooked; I didn't have farfalle pasta, so I substituted rotini; I didn't have limes so I garnished with lemons; and I didn't have Chihuahua cheese, so I used Cotija throughout. But that's part of cooking, I think - you use what you have. And Marlowe's recipes are flexible and easily adapted to substitutions. Just another reason to adore this book.

  • 2 C corn, fresh or thawed if frozen
  • 3 T olive oil, divided
  • 1 pound large raw shrimp, peeled and thawed if frozen
  • 1 medium jalapeño, deseeded and diced
  • 2 to 3 cloves garlic, peeled and pressed
  • 1 t chili powder
  • 1/8 t cayenne pepper
  • 1 T cornstarch or flour
  • 2 C milk (I used whole milk)
  • 1 package pasta (I used rotini)
  • 1 C Cotija cheese + more for garnish
  • herbs for garnish (I used parsley and cilantro)
  • lemon wedges for garnish
  • candied jalapeño for serving, optional

Procedure

Cook your pasta according package directions. Drain and set aside.

In a pot (I used my Le Creuset 3-1/2 quart braiser), heat 1 T oil and cook the corn till it's charred. Transfer the corn to a plate.

Add another tablespoon of oil to the pan and arrange the shrimp in a pan in a single layer. Cook them till they are pink and opaque, approximately 2 to 3 minutes per side. Transfer the shrimp to the same plate as the corn.

Add the final tablespoon of oil to the pot. Stir in the jalapeño and garlic. Cook until softened and aromatic, approximately 2 to 3 minutes. Sprinkle in the chili powder, salt, and cayenne powder.

Then whisk in the cornstarch and cook until the mixture is smooth. Whisk in the milk and stir till the sauce thickens to your desired consistency.

Finally fold the corn, half the shrimp, and Cotija cheese into the sauce. Add in the cooked, drained pasta and stir to coat completely.


To serve, sprinkle with herbs, add citrus wedges, and top with candied jalapeño, if using.

You may find Strawberry Blondie Kitchen on the webon Facebook, on Instagram
on Pinterest, and on Twitter.
You may find Page Street Publishing on the webon Facebook, and on Instagram.

*This blog currently has a partnership with Amazon.com in their affiliate program, which gives me a small percentage of sales if you buy a product through a link on my blog. It doesn't cost you anything more. If you are uncomfortable with this, feel free to go directly to Amazon.com and search for the item of your choice.
I have also added this to #FoodieReads.
Click to see what everyone else read in March 2020: here.

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