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Sangervasio with a Soup from Brazil #ItalianFWT #Sponsored

 This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of Sangervasio in conjunction with the November #ItalianFWT event.
Compensation for this post was provided and this page may contain affiliate links

Last month the bloggers in the Italian Food Wine & Travel group virtually visited the Chianti region. You can read my post: A Glass of Chianti & Dreams of Porchetta. Instead of moving to a different region for this month, we decided to stay in Chianti and dive a little bit deeper into the wines and the region.

The Rest of the #ItalianFWT Group 
Join our Italian Food Wine and Travel group on Saturday November 4 at 10am CDT on Twitter as we discuss our Chianti findings. We’ll all be posting and chatting, join us! Just look for the #ItalianFWT hashtag on Twitter Saturday morning!

See what the other Italian Food Wine & Travel Enthusiasts have to offer this month...

The Wine
Sangervasio shipped me two bottles of their 2015 to taste and pair. Hooray! I love wines from Chianti and I love finding new-to-me wine producers. Sangervasio didn't disappoint. I especially appreciate that the wine is made from organically-grown grapes that are harvested by hand.


Made from 100% Sangiovese grapes, this wine is lively but not overly bold or heavy. Marked by berry, herb, and solid tannins, it's still subtle and aromatic which makes it extremely food-friendly. It was a lovely pour!


The Soup
While I would typically pair the Sangervasio with an Italian dish, I opted to go off the rails a little bit and pair the wine with one of my favorite soups...from Brazil. Well, it's really a stew. It has some nice aromatic notes and I was pleasantly surprised by the match.

There are many variations of Moqueca, a fish stew from Brazil, but this is the one I learned from a local-to-me chef and it includes plantains which I haven't seen too often in other versions.


Ingredients

  • 2 to 3 pounds of seafood (I used a combination of mussels, scallops, shrimp, squid, and monkfish)
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 T freshly squeezed lime juice + lime wedges for garnish
  • freshly ground salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • olive oil
  • 1 C chopped celery
  • 1 C chopped onion
  • 1 C chopped plantain
  • 2 large tomatoes, sliced into wedges
  • 1 T sweet paprika
  • pinch of red pepper chile flakes
  • 3 C water or fish stock (or a combination of those)
  • 1 can coconut milk
  • 1/2 C fresh cilantro chopped + more for garnish
  • fresh green onions, trimmed and thinly sliced for garnish
  • Also needed: cooked rice (I used black Forbidden rice)

Procedure
Place seafood in a large bowl and toss with garlic and lime juice. Sprinkle liberally with salt and pepper. Let stand.

Heat a splash of olive oil in a large soup pot. Add in the celery and onions and cook until the onion is translucent. Add in the plantains and tomatoes and cook for another 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in the paprika and chile flakes and pour in the water or stock. Bring to a boil and lay seafood on the top. Pour any of the marinade into the pot as well. Cover and simmer until the seafood is opaque, approximately 5 minutes. Stir in the coconut milk and heat till it's warm. Stir in the cilantro. Adjust seasoning as needed if you prefer more salt and pepper.


To serve, place a scoop of rice in your bowl and ladle seafood around the mound of rice. Pour the broth over the seafood and garnish with fresh cilantro and green onions. Serve immediately.


Saúde as they say in Brazil and Cin cin as they say in Italy! Thanks for joining us in our deeper dive into Chianti. Next month Susannah of Avvinare will be hosting us as we talk about Christmas Feast Wines. Can't wait. I love Christmas in Italy.


Find Sangervasio...
on the web

*Disclosure: I received sample wines for recipe development, pairing, and generating social media traction. My opinions do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the organizer and sponsors of this event.

Comments

  1. I love moqueca! Our town in South Florida is home to a vibrant Brazilian community, including restaurants and grocery stores. Your post has made me want to hop on a plane and visit in person. Can't wait to try your recipe.

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a beautiful dish! Thanks for reminding us that red wines (especially Chianti) can go great with seafood.

    ReplyDelete

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