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A Vin de Pays d'Oc Chardonnay and an Edible Mollusc from Monterey #Winophiles


Here we are at the April 2017 event for The French Winophiles, a wine-swilling, food-loving group started by Christy of Confessions of a Culinary Diva and, now, jointly coordinated by Jill of L'occasion and Jeff of Food Wine Click. This month, Lauren of The Swirling Dervish has asked us to get creative with a French wine and a food pairing from elsewhere. Here's Lauren's invitation: here.

If you are reading this early enough, we'll be chatting on Saturday, April 15th at 11am EDT. Join us on Twitter using the hashtag #Winophiles. Or come check out the stream later and try to join us next month.

This month's topic definitely seems to fly in the face of the adage I often rely on: “what grows together, goes together.” When I pick a wine, I usually search for a recipe that hails from the same region. But, here we go on a cross-cultural adventure...

The Rest of the Winophiles' Offerings...



My Pairing...
I decided to share a Vin de Pays d'Oc Chardonnay from Laurent Miquel.



Vin de Pays d'Oc vineyards are considered France's oldest, dating back to the Greeks of the 5th century. In addition to being the oldest, it's also a region three times as large as Bordeaux. 


Solas Chardonnay is a classic Burgundian-style, food-friendly wine that balances effortlessly between an oaky richness and a crisp minerality. Chardonnays are not usually one of my favorites, but this one is aptly named. 'Solas' is the Irish word for light; in Old French, it means 'joy' or 'pleasure.' It is all of those things!


For the food pairing, I didn't go too far. It just so happened that, on the week I was to prepare for this post, I received a packet of fresh abalone from my CSF (that's community-supported fishery, in case you're wondering) Real Good Fish. So, that made my pairing really simple: French wine + Monterey Bay abalone. Gotta love having fresh, delicious, edible mollusc right off your shore.


I made a Meunière-Style Monterey Bay Abalone and served it over some leftover Arròs Negre. We also had some shrimp-squid ceviche and gazpacho to round out the meal.

Ingredients serves 4
  • 6 to 8 small abalone (ours were vacuum-packed, pre-shucked and pre-tenderized)
  • 2 small eggs
  • 1 C gluten-free flour
  • 1/2 t freshly ground pepper
  • 6 T butter
  • splash of olive oil
  • zest from 2 organic Meyer lemons
  • juice from 2 organic Meyer lemons


Procedure
In a small mixing bowl, beat the eggs.


In another small mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, pepper, and lemon zest. Dip each abalone in the egg mixture, then coat each abalone in flour, shaking off excess. Repeat for a second dipping to make the crust thicker.


Melt butter in a splash of olive oil in a large, flat-bottom pan over medium-high heat. When the butter begins to foam, place the abalone in the pan. Gently agitate the pan, allowing the butter to turn brown and give off a nutty aroma.


After 2 minutes, turn the abalone and cook for another 2 minutes. Remove from heat. Add lemon juice to the pan and cook until slightly thickened. Pour the sauce into shallow dishes for dipping.


To serve, place a scoop of Arròs Negre on your plate. Top the rice with abalone and a slice of lemon.


Next month, LM Archer of binNotes, leads a discussion called 'A drive thru Bourgogne PART 1.' Stay tuned for more information about that.

Comments

  1. Camilla, you are my kind of cook. Anyone who just happens to have ceviche and gazpacho in the frig, ready to add to a meal is a winner in my book!

    ReplyDelete
  2. You had me at abalone! It's been way too long since I've had some. Looks and sounds like a great pairing!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love your pairing! And the fact that you've got your kids involved in the preparation. Not sure I can find fresh abalone in my neck of the woods, but I'd love to try your recipe.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wonderful! The food is so local and sounds great with the Chardonnay. I love your creativity!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Nice, and great that you can participate in a system that supports local fishermen!

    ReplyDelete
  6. My husband caught me saying "Oh man, this sounds great", after I read through your pairing. Can only imagine the wine you chose paired beautifully with the abalone.

    Like you, I haven't been a fan of Chardonnay for a while but am re-discovering how amazing they can be from Bourgogne.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Wow! As a life-long Midwesterner I find locally sourced seafood to be fascinating. I had to get my hubby and show him this post, because... abalone!

    Also pleased to see a vin pays d'Oc featured. Very nice post, Camilla. Well done!

    ReplyDelete

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