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Home-Roasted Coffee for 'The Breakfast Club' {Food'N'Flix}


Food‘nFlixDebra from Eliot's Eats is hosting this month's Food'N'Flix. And we are going back to the mid-80s with The Breakfast Club. Click to see her invitation.

When it comes to 80s movies, there are two prevailing genres: slasher films and coming-of-age comedies. Think Sixteen CandlesPretty in PinkSome Kind of Wonderful, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, and The Breakfast Club...all of which were creations of the late John Hughes. I was coming of age in the mid-80s - learning to drive, first kisses, etc. - so I probably watched all of the movies in the latter genre; I wasn't much for horror flicks.

The premise is pretty formulaic: put a bunch of people in a room and see what happens.  Even the characters are ridiculously stereotypical. There's "a brain, an athlete, a basket case, a princess, and a criminal." But the movie is genius in leveling the field. No matter how different they all appear at the onset, they all suffer from the same problems. Like most teenagers, none of them communicate well with their parents, each feels tremendous pressure from their peers, and all are angst-ridden about their future. Remember those years?!

In The Breakfast Club, Hughes created a surprisingly enduring film that is still funny almost 30 years after its theatrical debut.

I toyed with making something from the lunch scene....

There was Claire's sushi. 
"You won't accept a guys tongue in your mouth and you're gonna eat that?" Bender heckled her.

There was Allison's Pixie Stick-Sugar-Cap'n Crunch sandwiches.
But...well...yuck! I'm a food snob.

Then I thought about what makes me smile at breakfast time. Coffee! Eureka. I decided to make it all the way from green bean to cup o' joe. And, unlike, Mr. Vernon I'm careful to keep my coffee in my mug...and not all over my desk.

Home-roasted coffee starts with the green beans.


Add heat and agitation. When I took a quick coffee-roasting lesson, we used a roaster. But, at home, I just used my skillet. It worked great. It took some patience...and I only set off the smoke alarm twice!

When you roast coffee, and you're using good beans, do a light roast. That way you can actually taste the characteristics of the bean. Dark roasting homogenizes the flavor. A dark roasted bean of good quality tastes exactly the same as a dark roasted bean of mediocre quality.


Grind your beans. Only grind what you plan to use.


I decided to use my French press.


I use 2 T ground coffee per cup. I take the kettle off the stove right before it boils. I think I read somewhere that you want your water at 205 degrees. I'm never that precise. Pour your water over the grinds, cover, and let steep.

Steep for 4 minutes, then press the plunger down.


For me, I love my coffee black. That way I can taste the beans, whether they are fruity, citrusy, or nutty...I just love the taste of coffee. How do you like your coffee?


If you want to join the fun, you still have a bit of time. Submissions are due to Debra by January 27th. And next month, I'm hosting! Join us in watching and cooking from Babette's Feast. Check back for my invitation on February 1st.

Comments

  1. So cool that you roasted your own coffee and it is perfect for this movie. I am impressed. And Babette's Feast is the first foodie and foreign film I have ever seen in my life when I was like 8 yrs old, great choice.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Very impressive that you roasted your own coffee. I did it once years ago in a wok/skillet and it does take patience. ;-) A perfect choice for the movie! I am looking forward to Babette's Feast this month.

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