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Bánh Mì + A Wine Suggestion #NationalPicnicDay


We love picnics! So, when I saw that Ellen of Family Around the Table was hosting a Festive Foodies event to celebrate National Picnic Day, I was excited to participate and get some new ideas for Summer and Spring meals al fresco. Sometimes our picnics are as easy as jarred tapenades, sliced breads, cheese, and fruits.


Sometimes I'll prep salads or chilled soups. We picnic in parks, on the beach, wherever we happen to be. And, on special occasions, we'll even hike in a bottle of bubbly or wine. Wine bottles are heavier than you would think; my husband groans when he sees me packing one.


For this #NationalPicnicDay event, I wanted to share our favorite sandwich: Bánh Mì.


But on the afternoon I was packing these up, this is what it looked like outside! Darn it. So, we picnicked at our dining room table instead. I promised the boys we'd re-do these on another day, when the sun was shining.


But before I get to my recipe, here are the picnickers' offerings!

The Festive Foodies' Picnic Basket

Bánh Mì

Bánh mì is a Vietnamese term for all kinds of bread, derived from bánh (bread) and mì (wheat). But, more often than not, it refers to the baguette which was introduced by the French during its colonial period. But when we say it, we're usually referring to the Vietnamese sandwiches that my boys adore. These sandwiches combine French ingredients such as baguettes, pâté, and mayonnaise with native Vietnamese ingredients such as cilantro, cucumber, pickled carrots, and daikon.


Ingredients 
makes 8 sandwiches with 4 or 5 meatballs each

Meatballs
  • 2 pounds ground pork
  • 1 T chopped cilantro
  • 1 T chopped basil
  • 1 T chopped parsley
  • 1 t minced ginger
  • 1/2 t minced lemongrass
  • 1 to 2 scallions, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and pressed
  • 2 t fish sauce
  • 2 t soy sauce
  • 1 T Sriracha or other hot sauce


Pickled Carrots and Daikon
  • 4 to 5 medium carrots, julienned (I used orange, yellow, and purple carrots)
  • 1 daikon radish, peeled and thinly sliced (I used a mandolin slicer)
  • 4 T organic granulated sugar
  • 2 T fish sauce
  • 1/2 C rice wine vinegar
  • 1 t sesame oil
  • 2 t minced cilantro

Spicy Mayo
  • 1/2 C organic mayonnaise
  • 1 to 2 T Sriracha or other hot sauce

To Assemble
  • 2 baguettes, cut into 4 equal pieces and lightly toasted 
  • pâté
  • fresh cilantro
  • fresh cucumbers, thinly sliced lengthwise
  • waxed paper or parchment paper (if actually taking these on a picnic)
  • cotton twine (if actually taking these on a picnic)
Procedure

Pickled Carrots and Daikon
(This can be done the night before, but should be done at least six hours before serving.)


Place julienned carrots and sliced daikon in separate bowls. Bring the sugar, vinegar, and fish sauce to a simmer. Stir till the sugar is dissolved. Stir in the sesame oil and cilantro. Divide the hot liquid in half and pour half over the carrots and half over the daikon. Make sure the vegetables are as submerged as possible. Set aside until ready to serve.

Spicy Mayo
(This can be done the night before, but can also be done at the last minute.)
Place ingredients in a small mixing bowl. Stir together until well combined. Set aside.


Meatballs
In a large bowl, using your hands, mix together all of the ingredients until well-combined. Roll walnut-sized balls and place them on a parchment or silicone-lined baking sheet. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Bake for 35 minutes until well-browned.


To Assemble
Open up each piece of bread. Spread the Sriracha mayonnaise on one side. Smear pâté on the other side. Place the meatballs on the bread. Top with picked carrots, pickled daikon, cucumber slices, and fresh cilantro. Enjoy! If you're taking this in a picnic basket, wrap them tightly with waxed paper or parchment paper and tie with twine.


And, as a bonus, I'm offering a wine pairing! With the sandwiches, I poured the 2015 Picpoul Blanc from Adelaida Vineyards & Winery, Paso Robles, California.


I had initially opened up this wine to go with the Bourride à la Sétoise I made for April's French Winophiles event last weekend. You can read that post: here. But neither of us really cared for it with that dish. So, I poured it with the Bánh Mì and it worked really, really well.

On the nose I got aromas of tropical fruits, citrus, and brioche. On the tongue, those complex notes were matched with just enough citrus and savory spices to complement spicy Asian fare. If you can't get your hands on a Picpoul, I would suggest an unoaked Chardonnay or Grüner Veltliner. Cheers.

Comments

  1. Yay for another Picpoul pairing. I think these sandwiches would be wonderful to serve alongside my Asian Slaw. Thanks for the recipe Cam.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Pickled veggies works on here, yum!

    ReplyDelete

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