Skip to main content

Celebrating Spring with Vignole + 2020 Barberani Castagnolo Orvieto Classico Superiore #ItalianFWT #Sponsored

This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of the Consorzio Vino Orvieto.
Complimentary wine was provided for this post and this page may contain affiliate links.
However, all opinions expressed here are my own.

This month the Italian Food Wine Travel group is looking at the wines of Orvieto. Jen of Vino Travels is hosting. If you are reading this early enough, feel free to jump in to our live chat on Twitter on Saturday, May 7th at 8am Pacific. Follow the hashtag #ItalianFWT and be sure to add that to anything you tweet so we can see it. Here are the articles that the writers are sharing...

Grazie Mille!

Many thanks to the Consorzio Vino Orvieto* for sponsoring this month's event and sending samples to members of the group. I received four bottles along with a book about the region. I am looking forward to exploring and learning more.

If you are unfamiliar, as I was, Orvieto is both a white wine - made primarily from a blend of the Trebbiano and Grechetto grapes - from the areas of Umbria and Lazio. And it is also the wine region in which these wines are produced.

The wine-making history of the region goes back to the Medieval Ages. Then, the wine was a sweet, dessert libation. Flash forward to now, it is usually a small-batch blend of white wine grapes that are primarily Trebbiano and Grechetto, but can also include Drupeggio, Malvasia, Canaiolo Bianco, and Verdello blended in. Grechetto lend a fruitiness and weight to the blend. Blending policy in the Orvieto DOC - which is exclusively for white wine -  now allows for the addition of other grape varieties such as Riesling and Sauvignon Blanc; additionally there is a Rosso Orvietano that uses a blend of Barbera, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Pinot Nero, Dolcetto, Merlot, and others. 

I did receive a bottle of rosso in my shipment. I can't wait to experiment with that. But, for this post, I opted to feature...

2020 Barberani Castagnolo Orvieto Classico Superiore

Made by Niccolò Barberani, this is vegan, organic, and a modern take on the Orvieto Classico tradition. Comprised of a traditional grapes, it's 70% Grechetto and 30% Trebbiano Procanico.

The wine pours a vibrant yellow straw color. On the nose, the bouquet has layers of green apple, lemon blossom, and wet granite. On the palate, it has a crisp and playful energy. I jotted down: herbaceous, silky, clean, mineral. 'The embodiment of Spring' also made it into my tasting notes. So, I decided to make a beautiful Italian Spring stew.

Vignole

I have been making a version of this without ever knowing it had a name. Vignole apparently originated in Rome, and a vegetable stew that showcases the best of the season including artichokes, fava beans, Spring greens, and peas. I went to the market and picked up green garlic, fennel, rainbow chard, asparagus, purple and golden sugar snap peas, herbs, and these curly, gorgeous cruciferous curls called Spigarello Broccoli. 


These definitely would have been something I picked up in the markets in Rome! Funky and full of nutrition...just what I like. This stew is so simple. Feel free to adjust and substitute to the ingredients that you have on-hand.


  • 1/4 cup green garlic, trimmed and minced
  • 2 cups shaved fennel
  • 3 Tablespoons olive oil (I used a smoked olive oil for added flavor)
  • 2 cups rainbow chard, chiffonaded
  • 2 cups Spigarello broccoli (substitute Lacinto kale if you can't find Spigarello)
  • 4 cups veggie or chicken stock
  • 1 cup fresh peas
  • 2 cups asparagus cut into 1-inch lengths
  • 2 cups quartered artichoke hearts (canned or jarred works well)
  • 1/2 cup fresh chopped parsley
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh chopped fennel fronds
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh chopped dill
  • 2 teaspoons capers

Heat olive oil in a heavy-bottom pot. Add in the green garlic and cook until fragrant - just a minute or two. Stir in the fennel and cook until softened, approximately 4 to 5 minutes. Stir in the chard and Spigarello ribbons and toss to coat with the oil. When glossy, pour in the stock and bring to a boil. Fold in the peas, asparagus, and artichoke hearts. Remove from heat and let stand for five minutes. Mix the herbs together. Set aside 2 teaspoons of mixed herbs and fold the rest into the stew.


To serve, ladle stew into individual serving bowls. Spoon 1/2 teaspoon of capers on the top. Sprinkle 1/2 teaspoon of herbs over the stew and serve immediately.


The wine and the stew were a perfect celebration of Spring! I can't wait to delve deeper into the wines of Orvieto.


Find the Consorzio Vino Orvieto on the web, on Facebook, on Instagram, on Twitter

*Disclosure: I received compensation in the form of wine samples for recipe development and generating social media traction. My opinions do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the organizer and sponsors of this event.

Comments

  1. As I read through all the Orvieto posts, it's interesting to see the grapes used by each producer. With just two in your wine, this is one I'd like to taste to compare it to mine, which all had four or more varieties. Cheers to Vignole!

    ReplyDelete
  2. "Funky and full of nutrition" is my jam, too. I definitely would make this stew. Sounds perfect with the Orvieto. Happy Spring!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I couldn't wait to try the Rosso. Ha! I have to say, I am LOVING those tulip photos.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This stew sounds so delicious and your photos make me want to leap through the screen to your kitchen!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Quick Pickled Red Onions and Radishes

If you've been reading my blog for even a short amount of time, you probably know how much I love to pickle things. I was just telling a friend you can pickle - with vinegar - or you can ferment - with salt - for similar delicious effect. The latter has digestive benefits and I love to do that, but when I need that pop of sour flavor quickly, I whip up quick pickles that are ready in as little as a day or two. I've Pickled Blueberries , Pickled Asparagus , Pickled Cranberries , Pickled Pumpkin , and even Pickled Chard Stems ! This I did last night for an upcoming recipe challenge that requires I include radishes. Ummmm...of course I'm pickling them! Ingredients  makes 1 quart jar radishes, trimmed and sliced organic red onions, peeled and thinly sliced (I used a mandolin slicer) 3/4 C vinegar (I used white distilled vinegar) 3/4 C water 3 T organic granulated sugar 1 T salt (I used some grey sea salt) 6 to 8 grinds of black pepper Proce

Hot Chocolate Agasajo-Style {Spice It Up!}

photo by D For my Spice It Up! kiddos this week, I was looking for an exotic drink to serve while we learned about saffron. I found a recipe from food historian Maricel Presilla that mimicked traditional Spanish hot chocolate from the 17th century where it was served at lavish receptions called agasajos . When I teach, I don't always get to shoot photos. Thankfully, D grabbed my camera and snapped a few. Ingredients serves 14-16 1 gallon organic whole milk 3 T dried rosebuds - or 2 t rosewater 2 t saffron threads, lightly crushed 3 T ground cinnamon 3 whole tepin chiles, crushed 2 vanilla beans, split lengthwise 1 C organic granulated sugar 1 lb. bittersweet chocolate Procedure In a large soup pot that can hold a gallon plus, combine milk, dried rosebuds (or rosewater, if you are using that), saffron threads, ground cinnamon, chiles, vanilla beans, and sugar and warm over medium heat till it steams. Whisk to dissolve sugar, then lower heat an

Aloo Tiki {Pakistan}

To start off our Pakistani culinary adventure, I started us off with aloo tiki - potato cutlets. I'm always game for tasty street food. I found a couple of different recipes and incorporated those together for this version. Ingredients 6-8 small red potatoes, scrubbed 1 T cumin seeds 1 T fresh chopped parsley 1/2 t ground coriander 1 t minced garlic Procedure Boil the potatoes until they are tender. Drain and let cool. Mash the potatoes. Traditionally they are mashed without their skins. I left the skins on. In a small pan, toast the cumin seeds on high heat until the begin to give off an aroma and begin to darken. Remove from heat and transfer to a plate to keep them from cooking any more. Blend all of the spices into the mashed potatoes, then shape into small patties. If you wet your hands, the potato mixture won't stick to them. Heat a splash of oil in a large, flat-bottom pan. Dip each patty into beaten egg and carefully place in the oil. P