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Torta Della Nonna + Val d’Oca Prosecco Millesimato #ItalianFWT #Sponsored

This is a sponsored post written by me in conjunction with the February #ItalianFWT event.
Wine samples were provided for this post and this page may contain affiliate links.

You can read about the wine I poured for this pairing in my post Handrolled Pasta alla Gricia + Val d’Oca Prosecco Millesimato. This was the final course of that evening's dinner. 

The perlage of the wine was a nice texture foil to the creamy custard filling of the torta. But, I'll be honest: we ate the leftovers of this torta with a second Val d'Oca wine and enjoyed that one much more! Stay tuned for my thoughts on the Val d'Oca Sparkling Rosé.


I actually haven't eaten pine nuts in years. After Jake and I ate spoiled pine nuts and had a metallic taste in our mouths for days, we've avoided those nuts like the plague. I usually substitute pistachios, almonds, or pecans. But I really wanted to make a traditional Torta della Nonna for my wine pairing, so I risked it!

Ingredients makes one 10" torta

Bottom Crust
  • 100 g organic granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg + 1 egg yolk
  • 80 g oil (I used canola oil)
  • zest of 1 organic lemon (I used a Meyer lemon since my parents have a tree in their yard)
  • 280 g flour (I used all-purpose flour)
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 t baking powder
  • Also needed: 9" tart pan with removable bottom, rolling pin, baking sheet

Filling (Vanilla Cream)
  • 500 ml whole milk
  • 1 vanilla pod, sliced lengthwise with seeds scraped
  • 3 eggs
  • 100 g organic granulated sugar
  • 30 g corn starch
  • 25 g butter

Top Crust
  • 100 g organic granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg + 1 egg yolk
  • 80 g oil (I used canola oil)
  • zest of 1 organic lemon (I used a Meyer lemon since my parents have a tree in their yard)
  • 280 g flour (I used all-purpose flour)
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 t baking powder
  • 1 C raw pine nuts
  • Also needed: rolling pin

Finishing
  • organic powdered sugar, as needed
  • 1/4 C raw pine nuts

Procedure
Vanilla Cream
Place the milk and the vanilla bean and scraped seeds in a medium sauce pan and let stand for 20 minutes. Then scald the milk and let the vanilla steep in the milk for 10 minutes. In the meantime, in mixing bowl, blend the sugar and eggs until the mixture becomes fluffy and pale. Add the corn starch and whisk to combine.

Slowly pour the warmed milk into the egg mixture, whisking as you pour.  Place the saucepan back on the stove and bring to a boil. Whisking vigorously the whole time.  Once the mixture has thickened and just started to boil, remove from the heat. Keep whisking to keep it smooth. Spread the pastry cream into a dish and cover with plastic wrap, touching the top to keep the cream from developing a film.  Refrigerate until cool.

Bottom Crust
In the bowl of a food processor, place all of the ingredients. Pulse a few times until the mixture comes together. You should have pea-sized crumbles. Turn the mixture onto a parchment paper-lined work surface. Knead until you have an elastic dough that doesn't stick to your hands.

Roll the dough ball into a circle and transfer it to the tart pan. Prick the bottom with a fork and place in the freezer for at least 10 minutes. In the meantime, make the top crust.

Top Crust
In the bowl of a food processor, place all of the ingredients. Pulse a few times until the mixture comes together. You should have pea-sized crumbles. Turn the mixture onto a parchment paper-lined work surface. Knead until you have an elastic dough that doesn't stick to your hands. Roll the dough ball into a circle.


Remove the tart pan from the freezer and spoon the cooled vanilla cream into the crust. Lay the top crust on top of the custard and press the edges together to form a sealed tart.


Sprinkle pine nuts over the top. Gently press down on the nuts. Place the whole thing in the freezer while the oven reaches temperature. Heat oven to 350° F.  Place the tart pan on a parchment paper-lined baking sheets and place the tray in the oven.


Bake for 35 to 40 minutes. The crust should be firm and golden brown and the pine nuts toasted. Remove the tart from the oven and let cool completely before serving.


Before serving, dust the entire top of the tart with powdered sugar. Sprinkle with a few more pine nuts.


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*Disclosure: I received sample wines for recipe development, pairing, and generating social media traction. My opinions do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the organizer and sponsors of this event.

Comments

  1. Your food takes my breath away. I am so impressed by your dedication, photos and skills in the kitchen, while having fun, raising two kids and all else you do!. Cheers, Susannah

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Susannah! I really appreciate your kind words.

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