Skip to main content

Gelukkige Nuwe Jaar with Pannekoeke + Boschendal Brut Rosé #WinePW


Welcome to the first Wine Pairing Weekend post of 2022. Happy New Year! This month, Andrea of The Quirky Cork is hosting. Read her invitation. She invited us to explore bubbles from the around the world. 

If you are reading this in time, feel free to join us in a live Twitter chat on Saturday, January 8th at 8am Pacific time. Just follow the hashtag #WinePW. And be sure to add that to anything you tweet so we can see it. In the meantime, here are the posts the writers are sharing...


Boschendal Brut Rosé

When I saw Andrea's theme on the calendar, I tracked down a bottle of bubbles from Tasmania and a bottle from South Africa. Then I was reminded that Tasmania is the subject of the August 2022's theme in our World Wine Travel group. Stay tuned for that. So, the South African bottle it was.

The Boschendal Brut Rosé from South Africa comes from winemaker Lizelle Gerber who blends 93% Pinot Noir with a smidge of Chardonnay and a splash of Pinotage to give it that beautiful rose gold hue. On the nose, the wine boasted delicate floral notes along with summer stone fruit. But it was the brioche aromas that made this such a delight. The creamy mouthfeel was countered by a brightness that made this an easy pick as a brunch libation. Day drinking needs a cheerfulness on the tongue!

Pannekoeke

Pannekoeke are South African crêpes. When I first read the title on a list of South African cuisine, I expected something more like the Dutch pannekoeken; I have written about pannekoeken before: here. And we make crêpes often! But, no, these are definitely thicker than crêpes, but thinner than regular pancakes. They can be sweet or savory, but are most often rolled up with a cinnamon sugar blend. Done!

Ingredients serves 4 to 6

Pannekoeke

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1-1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 cups milk (I used whole milk)
  • 5 Tablespoons butter, melted and slightly cooled (if you are using unsalted butter, add 1/2 teaspoon of salt to the batter) plus more for greasing the pan
  • Also needed non-stick skillet or crêpe pan

For Serving

  • 6 Tablespoons organic granulated sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 lemon

Procedure

Pannekoeke
In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour and baking powder...and salt if you are using unsaled butter.

In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs and milk until well-combined and uniform in color. Slowly pour the egg mixture into the flour mixture and whisk until there are no more lumps.

Add in the melted butter and whisk till smooth. Let rest for 10 minutes.

Place your non-stick skillet or crêpe pan over medium-low heat. Grease with additional butter, then pour 1/2 cup batter into the pan and swirl to coat the bottom in a thin layer.

Okay, this isn't a video for this recipe, but you can see my technique for crêpe on my CulinaryCam YouTube channel. Sometimes it's easier to figure out by watching than by reading a description of how to do it.



Once the bottom is starting to turn golden, flip, and cook the other side. This goes very quickly, perhaps 60 to 90 seconds per side. Repeat with all the batter.

In a small mixing bowl, combine sugar and cinnamon. Squeeze a little lemon juice on the cooked Pannekoek and sprinkle generously with cinnamon sugar. Roll up and repeat with remaining Pannekoeke. Serve immediately.

Gelukkige Nuwe Jaar
That means 'happy new year' in Afrikans and is a wrap for the January 2022 #WinePW event. We'll be back next month when David of Cooking Chat hosts. Stay tuned for more information about that.

Comments

  1. "Day drinking needs a cheerfulness on the tongue!" Love this!
    Sounds like you found a lovely bottle.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for hosting! I love a good bubbly and this fit the bill.

      Delete
  2. I want some cheerfulness on my tongue and some of these crepes. Happy New Year Cam.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! I wish I could have some in my 'coffee' mug at this event right now. LOL.

      Delete
  3. What a beautiful dish and pairing. I would love this on my plate and in my glass.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I couldn’t pronounce most of your title ha! I love crepes and South African bubbly with it sounds like a good way to start the day 😃

    ReplyDelete
  6. Love your tasting notes - brioche aromas, creamy mouthfeel - yum! Your pairing sounds perfect, too!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I've had a few Tasmania bubbles. They've alway met or exceeded my expectation. Great pairing!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Sounds like a great pairing! Thanks for sharing Cam!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Another creative pairing! I was really curious to figure out what this was all about after reading the title!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I love that so many countries have an interpretation of crepes! This sounds delightful (and brunchy) with the Cap Classique!

    ReplyDelete
  11. This sounds like pure joy! I was recently reminded how good cap classiques are and here is another bottle to look for!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Quick Pickled Red Onions and Radishes

If you've been reading my blog for even a short amount of time, you probably know how much I love to pickle things. I was just telling a friend you can pickle - with vinegar - or you can ferment - with salt - for similar delicious effect. The latter has digestive benefits and I love to do that, but when I need that pop of sour flavor quickly, I whip up quick pickles that are ready in as little as a day or two. I've Pickled Blueberries , Pickled Asparagus , Pickled Cranberries , Pickled Pumpkin , and even Pickled Chard Stems ! This I did last night for an upcoming recipe challenge that requires I include radishes. Ummmm...of course I'm pickling them! Ingredients  makes 1 quart jar radishes, trimmed and sliced organic red onions, peeled and thinly sliced (I used a mandolin slicer) 3/4 C vinegar (I used white distilled vinegar) 3/4 C water 3 T organic granulated sugar 1 T salt (I used some grey sea salt) 6 to 8 grinds of black pepper Proce

Hot Chocolate Agasajo-Style {Spice It Up!}

photo by D For my Spice It Up! kiddos this week, I was looking for an exotic drink to serve while we learned about saffron. I found a recipe from food historian Maricel Presilla that mimicked traditional Spanish hot chocolate from the 17th century where it was served at lavish receptions called agasajos . When I teach, I don't always get to shoot photos. Thankfully, D grabbed my camera and snapped a few. Ingredients serves 14-16 1 gallon organic whole milk 3 T dried rosebuds - or 2 t rosewater 2 t saffron threads, lightly crushed 3 T ground cinnamon 3 whole tepin chiles, crushed 2 vanilla beans, split lengthwise 1 C organic granulated sugar 1 lb. bittersweet chocolate Procedure In a large soup pot that can hold a gallon plus, combine milk, dried rosebuds (or rosewater, if you are using that), saffron threads, ground cinnamon, chiles, vanilla beans, and sugar and warm over medium heat till it steams. Whisk to dissolve sugar, then lower heat an

Aloo Tiki {Pakistan}

To start off our Pakistani culinary adventure, I started us off with aloo tiki - potato cutlets. I'm always game for tasty street food. I found a couple of different recipes and incorporated those together for this version. Ingredients 6-8 small red potatoes, scrubbed 1 T cumin seeds 1 T fresh chopped parsley 1/2 t ground coriander 1 t minced garlic Procedure Boil the potatoes until they are tender. Drain and let cool. Mash the potatoes. Traditionally they are mashed without their skins. I left the skins on. In a small pan, toast the cumin seeds on high heat until the begin to give off an aroma and begin to darken. Remove from heat and transfer to a plate to keep them from cooking any more. Blend all of the spices into the mashed potatoes, then shape into small patties. If you wet your hands, the potato mixture won't stick to them. Heat a splash of oil in a large, flat-bottom pan. Dip each patty into beaten egg and carefully place in the oil. P