Skip to main content

Maltagliati e Trotte + Cascina del Pozzo Roero Arneis for #WinePW

Wine Pairing Weekend - #winePW - happens on the second Saturday of the month. And this month we are all pairing food with Arneis. Haven't heard of that varietal? I hadn't. Click to read what Valerie, of Girls Gotta Drink and this month's host, had to say in her challenge invitation: here.


So, in the spirit of #SummerofArneis, Arneis was the center of my menu for our first Al Fresco Friday dinner. Summer vacation is upon us.


We'll be talking about Arneis and summer wine pairings later today during our Twitter chat at 11:00 ET. Join in the conversation by following the hashtag #WinePW. Let's start with what everyone else brought to the table...

All the Summer Arneis Food Pairing Recipes!


In My Glass


I tracked down a 2012 Cascina del Pozzo Roero Arneis as soon as I heard what our assignment was this month.

As I said, I'd never heard of the varietal, much less tried it.

I was pleasantly surprised by the weight of this wine. It was so pale in hue, I was expecting a lighter, more astringent sip. But this wine was medium-bodied, floral, vibrant and expressive. 

I found it the perfect match for a homemade pasta and a whole roasted fish.

In the Middle of the Plate... 
The Enthusiastic Kitchen Elf helped me with the entire dinner. First up was our maltagliati con sugo dei porri. Maltagliati means, literally, badly cut. It's a hand-rolled, hand-cut pasta and is perfect for a Friday evening when you don't feel like pulling out the pasta machine. It's quick and purposefully imprecise. I love it!

Maltagliati con Sugo dei Porri

Ingredients per batch (we made two batches)
Pasta

  • 1 cup semolina wheat flour
  • 1 egg
  • water, as needed
  • fresh chopped herbs (we used thyme, oregano, and mint from D's garden)

Sauce

  • 2 leeks, trimmed and thinly sliced
  • olive oil
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • juice from 1 organic lemon
  • zest from 1 organic lemon
  • 1/2 cup shredded parmesan
  • fresh chopped herbs

Procedure
Pasta
Place the flour in a heap on a piece of wax paper. Create a deep well in the middle of the flour and crack the egg into this well.


Whisk the egg into the flour with the fork. Add water one tablespoon at a time. Once the dough comes together in a ball, begin gently folding the dough on itself, flattening, and folding again. We added the herbs at this stage.  Once it's firm enough to knead, knead the dough, incorporating more flour, as needed, to prevent the dough from sticking to your workspace.


Once you have a ball of dough, use a rolling pin to flatten it out. Then slice the pasta into irregular shapes. Set aside, on a parchment paper dusted with semolina, until you're ready to cook.


To cook: Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil. Drop the freshly made pasta in and wait for it to rise to the surface. Once it rises, boil for another minute before draining and tossing with your sauce.

Sauce
Cook leeks in a splash of olive oil until they are softened and beginning to turn translucent. Pour in the milk and simmer until thickened. Stir in the cheese to form a thicker sauce. Add in the lemon juice and lemon zest. Finally add the herbs before serving.

The second dish D and I made is an easy oven-roasted fish dish. I thought sage would pair nicely with the Arneis. I was right!

Trotte alla Salvia

Ingredients serves 4

  • 4 butterflied trout
  • leek, trimmed and cut into thin strips about 3" long
  • organic lemon, thinly sliced
  • fresh sage leaves
  • fresh chopped herbs (I used oregano, thyme, and mint)
  • spices (D crushed a bunch of different herbs and spices in a mortar. I didn't see what he used!)
  • olive oil
  • Need: toothpicks or twine to close the fish
  • shaved fennel for serving
  • fennel fronds for serving
  • orange wedges for serving

Procedure
Lay your fish on a parchment paper and preheat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Place the leeks, lemon slices, and roughly chopped sage leave inside the cavity.


Sprinkle your spices inside, then secure the fish closed with a tooth pick or with twice. We couldn't find our kitchen twine tonight.


Lay your fish on a parchment-lined baking sheet and drizzle with olive oil. Roast for 20 to 25 minutes - until the flesh is opaque and the skin is browned and crisped. Serve immediately, garnished with shaved fennel, fennel fronds, and a squeeze of orange drizzled over the top.


What a glorious way to start the weekend. I love summer vacation. We have less structure and more time to play in the kitchen. And I really adore eating outside in the fresh, warm air. Cin cin.


 Wine Pairing Weekend July: Join us next month!

In July Americans celebrate Independence Day and the French celebrate Bastille Day. July's Wine Pairing Weekend will take place on Saturday, July 11, led by Michelle Williams of Rockin Red Blog. The group will explore food and wine pairings from the United States and France. From Michelle: Get creative and make your favorite all American food and wine meal, your favorite all French food and wine meal, one of each or a combination of both! With these two regions the sky is the limit!

Comments

  1. Your pairing looks delicious! I love that you often get your kids involved! Cheers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Michelle! Looking forward to your event.

      Delete
  2. Wow! awesome pictures showing the process of you making that amazing meal. We too were surprised by our Arneis' color vs. the body of the wine. We thought after the poor that it was going to be extremely light,but pleasantly surprised by the medium body and outward fruit flavors.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! Thanks for visiting. I'm a little tardy in replying. Appreciate the visit and the comment. Cheers!

      Delete
  3. Looks like a fun meal! I'll put them on my list to try! Salute!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was really fun. Thanks for hosting and for introducing me to a new varietal.

      Delete
  4. What a wonderful summer meal and, once again, I am so jealous that you live in the middle of wine country where you can so easily find so many different wines.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes. I know. I'm a little bit spoiled. Thanks for stopping by, Wendy!

      Delete
  5. What a wonderful meal! It looks like everyone had fun getting their hands into making it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! They did have a great time. I'll admit: I love the help.

      Delete
  6. Impressed that you made fresh pasta! The whole meal looks wonderful. The Arneis I tried was not weighty at all, so interesting to see that yours was.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for visiting. Interesting that yours wasn't weighty. Sorry for the delayed reply. I appreciate the visit...and the comment.

      Delete
  7. Wow...making your own fresh pasta! Your dish looks and sounds amazing!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I read about making this maltagliati, but couldn't find the time to do so. It was very interesting to read and look through your preparations. Love the whole fishes as they serve in Italy too!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Caulibits Crni Rižoto (Croatian Black "Risotto") #Whole30

Last week, I participated in the Wine Pairing Weekend event 'New Year, New Wine." I paired Crni Rižoto with Dingac Vinarija’s Pelješac...and you can read my post: here . I was pouring a Croatian wine and decided to make a traditional Croatian dish. Every seafood restaurant in Croatia has a  Crni Rižoto  (black risotto) on its menu.  Crni Rižoto  is risotto dyed black with squid ink; I used cuttlefish ink for the same effect. However, since arborio rice is not Whole30 compliant, I made a version for myself that used caulibits instead of rice. Ingredients 1 C fish stock (or a combination of fish stock and vegetable stock) 1 T olive oil 1 medium shallots, peeled and minced 1 cloves garlic, crushed and minced 1/4 lb shrimp 1/4 lb squid tubes, cleaned and sliced into rings 1/4 lb scallops 1/4 lb clams, scrubbed 1/4 lb mussels, scrubbed 4 C caulibits, or chopped cauliflower 1 T fresh parsley, minced juice and zest from 1 organic lemon 1 t cuttlefish ink

Meyer Lemon Custard-Filled Matcha Turtles #BreadBakers

#BreadBakers is a group of bread loving bakers who get together once a month to bake bread with a common ingredient or theme. You can see all our of lovely bread by following our  Pinterest board  right here. Links are also updated after each event on the  Bread Bakers home page .  We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient. This month Stacy of Food Lust People Love  is hosting and she wrote: "Your bread can be large, as in one big animal, or small - animal-shaped rolls. Use your imagination! Points for flavor and shape!" If you are a food blogger and would like to join us, just send an email with your blog URL to Stacy at foodlustpeoplelove@gmail.com. Here's the animal-shaped bread basket from the #BreadBakers... Beef and Sweet Onion Dim Sum Pandas from Karen's Kitchen Stories Bird Bread Rolls from Ambrosia Easter Bunny Buns from Cook with Renu Ham and Cheese Elephant Rolls from Food Lust People Love Hedgehog Bread from Making Mir

Connecticut Lobster Rolls, Canned Lobster Bisque, and a 2019 Henry Fessy 'Maître Bonhome' Viré-Clessé #Winophiles

This month the French Winophiles group is looking at affordable wines from Burgundy.  Host Cindy of Grape Experiences wrote: "Burgundy, or Bourgogne, is known for its wines of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir... as well as Aligote, Gamay, Sauvignon, César, Pinot Beurot, Sacy, Melon in lesser quantities. Many of the well-known wines are quite expensive, but there are plenty of values to be found." Read her invitation here. And there won't be a Twitter chat for this event, so you will have to dive into the articles themselves to read about our pairings and findings. Here's the line-up... Wendy Klik from A Day in the Life on the Farm enjoys Domaine Chevillon Chezeaux Bourgogne Hautes Cotes de Nuits, 2018 Paired with a Maple Pecan Chicken . Camilla Mann from Culinary Adventures with Camilla shares her love of Connecticut Lobster Rolls, Canned Lobster Bisque, and a 2019 Henry Fessy 'Maître Bonhome' Viré-Clessé. Jeff Burrows of FoodWineClick! explains why we should Look t