Monday, February 10, 2020

Lussekatter #BreadBakers


#BreadBakers is a group of bread loving bakers who get together once a month to bake bread with a common ingredient or theme. You can see all our of lovely bread by following our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated after each event on the Bread Bakers home page

BreadBakers
This month Felice of All That's Left Are the Crumbs is hosting Bread Bakers with a Scandinavian bread event. She wrote: "Scandinavian bread culture has existed in Norway, Sweden, and Denmark from prehistoric time through to the present. Show us your best Scandinavian Bread! For this theme I have chosen the traditional three countries that make up Scandinavia - Norway, Sweden, and Denmark." 

I'm glad she clarified because I was about to make Dökkt Rúgbrauð, Icelandic Dark Rye Bread. Soon!

In the meantime, here's the #BreadBakers' Scandinavian bread basket...

Lussekatter 

When I started thinking about possible Scandinavian bread, I thought about when I made Rugbrød (Danish Rye Bread) from a kit that was sent to me from a friend in Denmark! Thankfully I had another Danish friend here who could read these instructions to me. Maybe I could try it without the crutch of a pre-mixed kit.


And just last month I shared my Fastelavnsboller (Danish Lenten Rolls) for #BakingBloggers, a different online group to which I belong. Those custard-filled, cardamom-kissed sweet rolls are on our table frequently.


Instead, for this, I am sharing a bread that my Spice It Up! kiddos made years ago and I neglected to post: saffron-scented Swedish bread called Lussekatter. I made the dough the night before class; they rolled them out. They did a great job.

Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 C organic whole milk
  • 1 t saffron threads
  • 2 t + 1/2 C organic granulated sugar
  • 1 T active dry yeast
  • 7 C white whole wheat flour
  • seeds from 6 cardamom pods, ground
  • 1/2 C butter, softened
  • 1/2 C organic sour cream
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 C golden raisins

Procedure

In a medium pot, heat the milk, saffron, and 2 t of sugar together until the milk is steamy. Remove from heat and stir to dissolve the sugar.


Let cool until warm to the touch. Sprinkle the yeast over the warm saffron-infused milk and let bloom for 5-10 minutes until frothy and foamy.


In a large mixing bowl, whisk together 6 C of the flour, remaining 1/2 C of sugar, and ground cardamom.

Make a well in the center of the flour and add the yeast-milk-saffron mixture, eggs, butter, and sour cream. Mix the ingredients until well incorporated.
  
Knead the dough, adding additional flour until the dough is still a little sticky to the touch, but does not completely stick to your hands when you handle it. Mix in the raisins.


Shape the dough into a ball and place in a large, oiled bowl. Cover with plastic wrap. Then place it in a warm place for 1-2 hours, until the dough has doubled in size. When the dough has doubled in size, break off pieces and form into balls. This is where the kids took over.


Roll the ball out into a snake, then curl the ends in opposite directions, forming an 's' with spirals at each end.

Place on a parchment-lined baking sheet and place in a warm spot until the dough shapes double in size, 30 minutes to an hour. I only had 30 minutes with my class, but it rose beautifully.

Preheat oven to 400°F. Place in the oven and cook for about 11-12 minutes - until the buns are golden brown.  Remove from oven and let cool for 5 minutes before eating.

5 comments:

  1. Don't you love when a theme allows you to go into the archives and retrieve a memory?

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  2. What a fun activity for your Spice It Up students! If you ask me, there is nothing more satisfying than shaping and baking bread. Lovely buns, Camilla!

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  3. Fantastic hands on class for the kids! Love the color from the saffron. And I need to try out those Lenten rolls too!

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  4. That really looks good! I am really enjoying the Scandinavian Bakers month on all the other blogs as well as yours

    best... mae at maefood.blogspot.com

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  5. Lovely Buns. The colour looks so inviting. And the fact that the children helped and enjoyed shaping them adds more value to the buns.

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