Saturday, February 29, 2020

Finger Banana Pancakes #SpringOnThePlate #MelissasProduce #Sponsored

  This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of Melissa's Produce.
I received complimentary product for the purpose of review and recipe development,
but all opinions are honest and they are my own. This page may contain affiliate links.

Can you believe that February is already over? And we even had a bonus day in February. But with the advent of March, I begin to see the steady parade towards the Vernal Equinox and Spring which is my favorite season.

Last week I noticed that Melissa's Produce* shared a photo of yellow dragonfruit on one of their social media channels. So, I reached out to my contacts at Melissa's Produce to see if they would want to sponsor a series of posts. I had my eyes on making some Spring-y, sunny dishes. And they did! I received a selection of yellow produce and set out to make some #SpringOnThePlate recipes.

Because the finger bananas were perfectly ripe when they arrived, I knew that they would be pushed over the edge in the next day or two, so I started with them. A couple of years ago I read Banana: The Fate of the Fruit that Changed the World by Dan Koeppel and was inspired to make a Cavendish Cream Pie. I considered making another batch of Deconstructed Banana Mousse Pies and the boys always vote for Flambéed Bananas, if they are given their druthers.

But they were headed out for a full day of robotics and I didn't have enough time to make the Cannelés I had originally planned, so I decided to make banana pancakes. If you've been following me for awhile, you'll know that I am pancake-challenged. I can make beautiful crêpes. My Dutch oven pancakes are dreamy. But try to make fluffy buttermilk pancakes and they are a flop. Then I created a recipe that makes pancakes that aren't unintentionally flat: ricotta pancakes! And I kept experimenting with regular pancakes. I finally have it...and I don't even have to be at elevation to keep them fluffy. Phew.

And a quick note on 'finger bananas', they are a smaller version of the Cavendish; you can read more about finger bananas the Melissa's Produce website here. After this, I did have a few more bananas left, so you might be seeing another finger banana recipe soon.


Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 C flour
  • 1 T baking powder
  • 1 T organic granulated sugar
  • 3/4 C milk (I used whole milk)
  • 1/2 C buttermilk
  • 1 egg
  • 2 T oil (you can use melted butter if you like)
  • 1/2 C sliced finger bananas + more for serving
  • butter for cooking
  • powdered sugar, for serving, optional
  • maple syrup, for serving, optional


Procedure
In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the milk, buttermilk, egg, oil, and sugar. Sift in the flour and baking powder. Stir until just moistened. Then fold in the sliced bananas.

Heat a griddle or frying pan over medium heat. Melt butter to coat the pan. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/3 C for each pancake. Brown on both sides and serve hot.


Place pancakes on individual serving plates and top with more sliced bananas. Let diners sprinkle their stack with powdered sugar or drizzle with maple syrup, if desired.


You may find Melissa's...
on the web, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram

*Disclosure: I received product for free from the sponsor for recipe development, however, I have received no additional compensation for my post. My opinion is 100% my own and 100% accurate.

Monday, February 24, 2020

Potée Comtoise + Andre & Michel Quenard Quenard Savoie Chignin Gamay 2018 #Winophiles


I initially tracked down a bottle of wine labeled - through an online vendor - as coming from the Jura in preparation for David's, of Cooking Chat, French Winophiles October event. Then I paired it with a new-to-us dish. Upon further reading, however, I realized that while the wine was from the wrong region, the dish was from the region where the wine was made. Boo. At least the dish and the wine matched!

So, now, you don't have to wait till October to get this recipe. It's perfect if you're still in the throes of winter where you live. Plus I was able to locate two bottles of wine from the correct region. Stay tuned for those...

In the Glass

In retrospect, I should have known that the wine was from the wrong region as I just poured a bottle of Quenard wine for our focus on the Savoie earlier this month. You can read that post A Taste of #vindesavoie: Älpermakkaronen + 2018 JP & JF Quenard Vin de Savoie Chignin where I write about both Savoie and Michel Quenard.

I found this bottle online and it retails for less than $20. Made from the Gamay grape varietal, Gamay is most well-known for its use in the lighter, fruit red wines of Beaujolais. However it is grown in the Maconnais, where most Macon Rouge is based on the grape. And, in the Loire, it's used to make Rosé wines in the Anjou and Saumur appellations; the Remy Pannier Rosé d'Anjou 2017 I paired with Roasted Rack of Lamb with Spiced Nectarine Chutney in August 2019 for #BakingBloggers included Gamay in its blend.

Outside France, Gamay is often blended with Pinot Noir in Switzerland and there are a few examples of its cultivation in Canada, Italy, and New Zealand. Also Gamay is an important varietal to the winemaking landscapes of Croatia, Kosovo and Serbia.

This wine was a delicious balance of herby and fruity with a hint of tart that was a great flavor foil to my meat-heavy dish. So, even though it didn't work for the event I thought it would, Jake and I really enjoyed this sip.

In the Bowl 

When I was researching dishes from the Savoie earlier, I came across mentions of Potée Comtoise, a hearty dish that was filling and kept peasants going during their work days. Although the ingredients varied, depending on the season, there are a few ingredients that would be present all year long, including smoked meats, pork, potatoes, cabbage, and carrots.

One thing that was mentioned in several versions was to stud the onions with whole cloves. That lent an amazing aroma to this dish while it cooked. I will definitely be using that technique in the future. Traditionally this would include turnips in the winter, but I didn't have any. Next time!

Ingredients serves 6


  • 1 pound pork (I used some boneless pork ribs)
  • 2 whole onions, peeled and studded with whole cloves
  • 4 to 5 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
  • 4 green onions
  • 3 whole bay leaves
  • water
  • 1 pound ham, cut into large chunks
  • 2 to 3 links of smoked sausage, sliced into thick coins
  • 4 carrots, sliced into 3" lengths
  • 4 celery ribs, sliced into 3" lengths
  • 5 or 6 scrubbed organic potatoes (I used Yukon gold)
  • 1/2 head organic green cabbage, cored and cut into wedges
  • olive oil, approximately 1 to 2 T
  • freshly ground salt, as needed
  • freshly ground pepper, as needed
  • Also needed: bread for serving (optional)


Procedure

Heat oil in a large pot; I used a Dutch oven. Brown the pork on all sides until nicely browned. Add garlic, clove-studded onions, and green onions to the pot. Fill with enough water to cover the meat by at least 2".

Bring liquid to a boil, then cover and reduce heat to a simmer. Cook for two hours, skimming fat and foam off, if needed. After two hours, add in the ham chunks and sausage coins. Simmer for another 30 minutes.

Add in the carrots, celery, and potatoes. Cover and cook until the vegetables are almost tender, approximately 30 minutes. Then add in the cabbage wedges. Press down so they are fully submerged and simmer for 10 more minutes.

Remove all of the meat and vegetables and keep warm in the oven. Turn the heat up to high and bring to a rolling boil. Reduce the cooking liquid by half, then adjust seasoning by adding salt and pepper, as needed.

To serve, place meat, sausages, and vegetables in the center of a deep platter. Ladle some broth over the dish and sprinkle with more salt and pepper, if desired. Serve with remaining broth and toasted bread on the side.

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Irish Stout Tea-Infused Truffles #MyAdagio #Sponsored

This post is sponsored by Adagio Teas
I received complimentary product for the purpose of review. All opinions are mine alone.

I received a care package from my contact at Adagio Teas,* and was excited to see a special St. Patrick's day blend called Irish Stout. 


Irish Stout is a blend of Assam and Ceylon teas, cocoa nibs, chocolate and creme flavors topped off with shamrock-shaped sprinkles. I will be using it to make a savory dish soon, so stay tuned for that. But I decided to start with a tea-infused truffle dipped in a green candy coating that would make any leprechaun proud.

Ingredients
makes approximately 2 dozen truffles

Truffle Filling
  • 1-1/2 C 60% cacao chocolate, chopped or chips (a higher percentage of cacao is great, too!)
  • 1 C organic heavy whipping cream
  • 1 T butter, softened
  • 1 T Irish Stout tea from Adagio Teas (or any black tea will work)

Finishing
  • 1-1/2 C green candy melts
  • green finishing sugar
Procedure

Truffles
Place chocolate and butter in a large mixing bowl.  In a medium saucepan, pour in the cream and float the tea on top. Heat until steaming.


Strain cream over the chocolate.  Let sit for three minutes, then whisk until smooth.


Refrigerate until firm - at least an hour. Now all you need to do is scoop the ganache into truffles...and dip them in a candy coating.


Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. With a tablespoon or tablespoon scoop, scoop chilled truffle ganache from your bowl and place on the lined tray. Refrigerate for a minimum of 15 minutes. I let mine chill for about 30 minutes.


Finishing
Place the candy melts in a bowl fitted over a simmering pan of water.


Dip chilled truffles in the melted chocolate, one at a time.  You may use a candy dipping tool, but I just use a two-toothpick combo. Dip the truffle quickly into the melted candy melt and shake off the excess.  Place on the lined tray and use another toothpick to nudge the truffle off of the toothpick.


Dip the toothpick back into the melted candy melt and dab with more candy melt to cover up any imperfections.


Immediately after dipping, sprinkle the truffle with finishing sugar as garnish.  Repeat with remaining truffles. Let the candy melt set. Store the truffles in an airtight container in the fridge. Let come to room temperature for serving.


I brought these in to robotics to share today. They were gone in the blink of an eye. I will be definitely be making another batch before St. Patrick's Day. Éirinn go Brách!


You may find Adagio Teas on the web, on Facebook, on Twitter, and on Instagram

*Disclosure: I received compensation in the form of tea samples for recipe development and generating social media traction. My opinions do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the sponsor.

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Magical White Fish B'stilla #FishFridayFoodies


It's time for Fish Friday Foodies' February event. We are a group of seafood-loving bloggers, rallied by Wendy of A Day in the Life on the Farm, to share fish and seafood recipes on the third Friday of the month. And this month Karen of Karen's Kitchen Stories is at the helm, while the group serves up Fish Friday Pies.

Karen provided a little guidance by saying we could make "pies, tarts, quiches, hand pies, pot pies, mini pies.... etc." Before I get to my pick, here's the line-up...


Magical White Fish B'stilla

I am notorious for never making the same thing twice. So, during a recent dinner party a few close friends were talking about some of our dinner party highlights over the years and one dish bubbled to the top as the most unforgettable dish I've ever made.

Then it turned into a challenge: "We know that you never make the same thing twice - that you can't make the same things twice - but even if you made the seafood pie and it was only half as good as the first one, it would still be the best dish you've ever made."

Seriously? Wow. A challenge, an insult, and a compliment all at the same time. Gotta love friends who tell the truth. 

They are referring to my Seafood B'stilla which is a Moroccan pot pie of sorts. Crisp phyllo dough wrapped around savory saffron filling, a spicy omelet stuffing, and ground nuts sweetened and flavored with citrus. A garnish of powdered sugar and cinnamon adds to the exotic blend of flavors. It takes some effort, but it's well worth it!

Ingredients 
makes one 11" b'stilla

Saffron Fish

  • 2 pounds white fish (I used a fillet of black cod, skinned and cubed)
  • 2 large sweet onions, peeled and chopped
  • 1 T ground ginger
  • 2 t freshly ground sea salt
  • 1 t freshly ground pepper
  • 1 t ground turmeric
  • 1 t saffron threads
  • 1 T ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 C butter
  • 1/4 C olive oil

Spicy Omelet

  • 1/4 C chopped fresh cilantro
  • 8 eggs, beaten

Sweetened Nuts

  • 2 C ground cashews (traditionally, it's made with almonds; I had cashews)
  • 1/2 C powdered sugar
  • 1 T lemon extract
  • 2 T butter, softened

To Assemble

  • 1 package phyllo dough, thawed according to package
  • 1/2 C butter, melted
  • more chopped fresh cilantro

To Garnish

  • 1/2 C organic powdered sugar
  • 2 or 3 T ground cinnamon


Procedure

Saffron Fish
Mix the fish cubes with onion, spices, butter and oil in a large flat-bottom pan that has a tight-fitting lid. Cover, and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, for about 30 minutes. Do not add water, and take care not to burn the fish or the sauce.

Remove the cooked fish to another dish, but leave the sauce in the pan. Bring the sauce to a boil and reduce until most of the liquids have evaporated. Stir occasionally, adjusting heat as necessary, to prevent burning.

Spicy Omelet
Add the beaten eggs to the reduced sauce and scramble. Cook till the eggs are set. Set the omelet aside.

Sweetened Nuts
Put all of the ingredients in a mixing bowl, and with a  pastry cutter, work in the powdered sugar, lemon extract, and butter. Set aside.

Assemble the B'stilla
I actually have never seen anyone really make b'stilla. So this is my own version...and it's been a hit the times I've made it. Melt butter in a saucepan and keep it liquid.


Generously oil a large round baking dish; as I mentioned up top, I used a 11" deep dish baker. If you don't have a round pan, work on an oiled flat baking sheet and shape a circular pie as best you can.


Overlap three or four single layers of phyllo dough, rotating as you lay them in the pan so that the excess dough hanging over the edge of the pan is evenly distributed around the circle. Butter each layer of dough as you go. This forms the bottom of the b'stilla. For my first layer, I spooned in the sweetened nut mixture.



Lay your fish pieces over the nuts and sprinkle with fresh cilantro. Lay two more layers of phyllo dough over the fish, buttering each piece.


Top that with a layer of spicy egg omelet. Lay two more layers of phyllo dough over the egg, buttering each piece. Repeat till your pan is full - or you run out of filling. I ended up with two layers of each filling - nuts, fish, and egg.

Fold the excess dough up and over your last layer to enclose the pie. Flatten the top and smooth out any bulky areas.


Brush butter on the folded edges of dough, and top with three more overlapping layers of phyllo, brushing butter on each layer as you go. Carefully tuck them underneath the pie, creating a flat top for the b'stilla. It's ready for baking.

Bake the B'stilla
Preheat the oven to 350° F. Bake for 40-45 minute until crisped and golden brown.

To serve, invert the b'stilla on your serving platter. Slice and serve with a side garnish of powdered sugar and ground cinnamon.

The verdict: the crisped phyllo, savory filling, and sweet topping were magical! At least that's what D said. I'll take it. It's not everyday my dinner is called magical.

And that's a wrap for February's #FishFridayFoodies. We'll be back next month with recipes that include tuna. Stacy of Food Lust People Love will be hosting. Stay tuned!

Cardamom Cake with Mulled Wine Jam #TheCakeSliceBakers


Here we are the February edition of the Cake Slice Bakers. For 2020, we'll be baking from The New Way to Cake: Simple Recipes with Exceptional Flavor by Benjamina Ebuehi.*

In this group, we are given a selection of three cake recipes. We each choose one cake to bake, and then on the 20th - never before - we all post about our cake on our blogs. There are a few rules that we follow, but the most important ones are to have fun and enjoy baking & eating cakes!


Follow our FacebookInstagram, and Pinterest pages where you can find all of our cakes, as well as inspiration for many other cakes. You can also click on the links below to take you to each of our cakes. If you have a blog and are interested in joining The Cake Slice Bakers and baking along with us, please send an email to thecakeslicebakers at gmail dot com for more details.

The Cake Slice Bakers also have a new Facebook group called The Cake Slice Bakers and Friends. This group is perfect for those who do not have a blog but want to join in the fun and bake through this book.

For the January post, I made her Spiced Sweet Potato Loaf with Cream Cheese Frosting. And, yes, it was simple and delicious. This month, I first tried ...

Before I get to my recipe, here's the line-up of #TheCakeSliceBakers' February offerings...

Hidden Pear Cake
Cardamom Cake with Mulled Wine Jam
Flourless Chocolate-Chili Cake

    Cardamom Cake with Mulled Wine Jam 
    makes one 9" layer cake / very slightly adapted from Benjamina Ebuehi

    Mulled wine is always a favorite., especially during the holiday season and the winter months. I like making Gløgg, a Danish Mulled Wine. So, given the choices, I knew I wanted to try this cake. I made some minor adjustments to the ingredients, including reducing the sugar, adding cardamom to the frosting, and using a combination of dried fruits instead of just dried plums.

    And apologies for the lack of process photos. I was making this for dessert while some of R's AP Physics II classmates were over working on a project in one part of the house and D was working on his IB MYP (International Baccalaureate MiddleYears Programme) Personal Project in the backyard. It was a hectic morning.

    Ingredients
    Cake
    • 1/2 C milk
    • 10 green cardamom pods, lightly crushed
    • 1 t pure vanilla extract or paste
    • 2-1/4 C flour
    • 2 t baking powder
    • 1 C butter
    • 3/4 C organic granulated sugar
    • 3 eggs
    • Also needed: two 9" cake pans, parchment paper
    Jam
    • 1 C red wine (I used a leftover Rioja)
    • 1 C dried figs, destemmed and quartered
    • 1 C dried plums, pitted and quartered
    • 1/2 C dried currants
    • 2 C organic black seedless grapes
    • 2 cinnamon sticks
    • 1 star anise pod
    • 1/4 t freshly grated nutmeg
    • 2 C organic granulated sugar
    • 2 T freshly squeezed lemon juice (I used a Meyer lemon)
    Frosting
    • 1 C mascarpone
    • 1 C organic powdered sugar
    • 1/3 C heavy whipping cream
    • 1/2 t ground cardamom
    • 1/2 t pure vanilla extract or paste


    Procedure

    Cake
    Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Butter and line baking pans with parchment paper. Set aside.

    Blend together flour and baking powder in a small mixing bowl.

    Place milk and cardamom pods in a small saucepan. Heat the milk until it is steaming, but not bubbling. Remove pan from heat and let steep for 15 minutes. Strain out the cardamom pods and whisk in the vanilla paste.

    In a large mixing bowl, beat together the butter and sugar until lightened and fluffy. Add in the eggs, one at a time, beating well between each addition. Alternate between adding half of the flour mixture and half of the milk mixture until combined. Repeat, then divide the batter evenly between the two prepared pans.

    Place pans on a baking sheet and in oven. Bake for 38 to 40 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Let cool in pans for 5 minutes before inverting to cool completely on a wire rack.

    Jam
    Add red wine, dried fruits, grapes, cinnamon sticks, and star anise pod to a medium saucepan. Cook over medium heat until the dried fruits are softened. Add in the sugar and lemon juice. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer. Cook until the jam coats the back of a spoon. Stir in grated nutmeg and remove cinnamon sticks and star anise. Let cool completely before using.

    Frosting
    Beat the mascarpone and sugar together in a mixing bowl until smooth. Fold in the cream, cardamom, and vanilla. Then refrigerate until you are ready to use it.

    Finishing
    Place one cake layers on your serving platter and scoop a generous layer of frosting on the top. Add a dollop or two of jam. Spread to the edges and place the second cake layer on top.


    Frost the sides and top, then refrigerate the cake so the frosting will set. Remove from the fridge about an hour before you plan to serve. Add extra dollops of jam before serving.


    That's a wrap for February's #TheCakeSliceBakers. I'm looking forward to March's choices though I haven't decided which one I am going to try. Stay tuned.

    *This blog currently has a partnership with Amazon.com in their affiliate program, which gives me a small percentage of sales if you buy a product through a link on my blog. It doesn't cost you anything more. If you are uncomfortable with this, feel free to go directly to Amazon.com and search for the item of your choice.

    Tuesday, February 18, 2020

    The Pale, Pale, Pale Red Velvet Layer Cake That Almost Wasn't #FantasticalFoodFight


    I love the Fantastical Food Fight coordinated by Sarah of Fantastical Sharing of Recipes. For more information about the event, click here.


    I haven't been very good at participating every month, but as this is the final installment, I knew I had to jump in Sarah shared: "I begin my Masters program in February and need to try and give it my undivided attention and decided that February's Red Velvet Food Fight will be the final food fight. I feel like we just started but we've been food fighting since November 2016. Isn't that crazy?! Thank you all for joining in and sharing recipes each month! It has been such a fun journey!" 

    So, I started planning, even though Red Velvet is sort of my Moby Dick. Let me explain. But first, here's the #FantasticalFoodFight final line-up...

    You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!
    Click here to enter

    The Pale, Pale, Pale Red Velvet 
    Layer Cake That Almost Wasn't

    Here's the story of the Pale, Pale, Pale Red Velvet Layer Cake That Almost Wasn't. Do you ever get the sense that the kitchen gods and goddesses are telling you to just give up? Well, I was getting the message loud and clear...except that this was meant to be my final post for the Fantastical Food Fight. So, come hell or high water, I was making - and posting - a darn red velvet cake. Or was I!??

    When I refer to Red Velvet as my 'Moby Dick, it's because success with that cake has eluded me for years; I have never successfully made a red velvet cake. Never. Not once. Mainly because I refuse to use a bottle of  (chemical) food dye that appears in many recipes. Use beet puree, they said. Tried that and it made a pink-tinged cake. Tasty, but not red. Use alkalized cocoa powder with vinegar, someone else suggested. That didn't work...the cake was as brown as could be. Not even a hint of red.

    I decided to wave the white flag and use food dye for this cake. But I wanted to use natural food dye and that is always a little problematic or really just unpredictable. Last week was Valentines' and, in preparation for that, I made some Iced Sugar Cookie Hearts. Look! Just a few drops of red dye made with beets and they were a bright pink.


    Then I left the bottle on the counter and the sun hit it all day. I told you it was made with beets, right? The next day I used the exact same bottle of dye for a cookie encore and it had turned purple! They were still pretty, but they weren't pink.


    I read an article about how Red Velvet is a cake from the 1950s that is moist and mildly chocolatey. So I decided to go with that. So, I bought a new natural red dye for this project! And, in the batter, it seemed red. Red enough anyway. But I was foiled...


    When my cake faded to a pale pink, I thought that the heat from the baking process was to blame. I opted to dye the cream cheese frosting red instead!


    As I was beating in the coloring, I caught the cord of my hand mixer on fire. So, I threw it out the front door and ended up with a pale, pale, pale red cake with pale, pale, pale red frosting.

    You can call it 'pink'! I think I've finally accepted that, as my Precise Kitchen Elf explained to me, "Red Velvet isn't your thing."

    Ingredients makes a two 9" layer cake

    Cake
    • 12 ounces flour
    • 14 ounces organic granulated sugar
    • 2 T cocoa powder (I used 1 T regular cocoa powder and 1 T black onyx cocoa powder)
    • 1 t baking soda
    • 2 large eggs, room temperature
    • 1/2 C oil (I used canola)
    • 1 C buttermilk, room temperature
    • 1 T white vinegar
    • 6 T melted butter, slightly cooled
    • 1 t pure cocoa extract
    • 1 T red food dye (I used a radish-based red this time)
    • Also needed: two 9" baking pans, parchment paper

    Frosting
    • 16 ounces cream cheese, softened
    • 16 ounces butter, softened
    • 1/2 t pure cocoa extract
    • 4 C organic powdered sugar
    • red food dye, as needed (I used a radish-based red this time)

    Procedure

    Cake
    Let all of your cold ingredients from to room temperature. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and line two 9" cake pans with parchment paper. 

    In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together eggs, oil, buttermilk, vinegar, melted butter, and cocoa extract. Fold in the flour, sugar, cocoa powder, and baking soda and whisk until just combined. Stir in the food dye.

    Divide batter between the two prepared cake pans and bake for about 38 to 40 minutes. Let the cakes cool in the pans for five minutes before inverting. Let cool on a wire rack completely before frosting.

    Frosting
    Place softened butter and cream cheese into a large mixing bowl and beat on low until completely smooth. Add in the cocoa extract and the powdered sugar. Add sugar 1 C at a time until fully incorporated and without lumps.

    Add food dye until desired color...or until your hand mixer cord sets on fire and you can't use it anymore! No, that's just a note to myself. I hope that doesn't happen to you.


    Place one cake layers on your serving platter and scoop a generous layer of frosting on the top. Smooth to the edges and place the second cake layer on top.


    Frost the sides and top, then refrigerate the cake so the frosting will set. Remove from the fridge about an hour before you plan to serve.


    There you have it. My Pale, Pale, Pale Red Velvet Layer Cake That Almost Wasn't. "More chocolate next time, Mom," suggested one. I doubt she's ever going to make Red Velvet again, observed the other. We'll see. 

    This certainly didn't turn out as I had planned, but I couldn't let the final Fantastical Food Fight go without attempting a cake. Thanks for all the fun, Sarah, and good luck with your Masters program!

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