Friday, December 20, 2019

Pairing a School Assignment with a #Winophiles Project: Moqueca + Gautier Vouvray Argilex 2012 #Winophiles


This month Jeff of FoodWineClick! is hosting the French Winophiles as we explore Vouvray. You can read his invitation here. And if you are reading this early enough, feel free to join in on our live Twitter chat. Saturday, December 21st at 8am (Pacific time). Follow the hashtag #Winophiles and be sure to use it if you chime in.

Here's the Vouvray line-up...

In the Glass

I was able to track down a few bottles and I will share my pairing of a sparkling Vouvray later. But, for this event, I am sharing my thoughts on the Gautier Vouvray Argilex 2012, a Chenin Blanc from Vouvray. Turns out that Vouvray is an important white wine appellation in the Touraine part of the Loire and runs the gamut from sweet to dry and still to sparkling. It is almost almost a single varietal - Chenin Blanc - but it can contain up to 5% Menu Pineau though that's still fairly uncommon.

Domaine Gautier, in Vouvray, has been in the family for seven generations and dates bak to the 17th century when vines are mentioned in a legal document dated 1669. Benoit Gautier took the helm in 1981.


The grapes for this Argilex are hand-harvested. The wine is labeled as sec which means dry. Other designations might be tendre - off-dry - demi-sec - half-dry - moelleux - very sweet - or liquoreaux - botrytized. This drier version has aromas of winter fruit and chamomile. But it was the hint of saffron that made this an alluring match for a savory soup from Brazil.

In the Bowl

On the night that I wanted to pour this, my Enthusiastic Kitchen Elf - D - had a school assignment he needed to complete. He and his friends were making a dish that fused old world ingredients with new world ingredients for their AP World History class project.


The version of moqueca that I know is Brazilian. D says the dish originated in El Salvador; I suspect it has roots and iterations in almost every Central American and South American country. As they cooked, R and D told me that the tomatoes were the only New World ingredient. They explained from where all of the ingredients came. 


You can go to the original recipe post here - Moqueca: A Dish That Fuses Old World and New World Ingredients.


I am always open to teaching kids how to cook or swapping lessons. My friends from Spain taught me how to make paella; I gave them Lumpia Lessons.

And that's a wrap for the 2019 French Winophiles events. We'll be back in January with our
Newcomer’s Guide to French Wine with Jeff of Food Wine Click! leading the discussion. Stay tuned and, in the meantime, Joyeux Noël et Bonne Année!

8 comments:

  1. How was the Pairing? It seems like with the plantains that the vouvray might be nice (was this a sweeter Vouvray?). The recipe looks delicious.

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  2. I'm so glad you could combine two projects during this busy time of year.

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  3. Super sounding dish! I'm betting most coconut based dishes would go pretty well with a dry or semi-dry Vouvray. Those with heat can stand a bit of residual sugar. Your experience? So great your son cooks!

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  4. Saffron, and then the coconut milk seems to add the creamy note that my research suggested for Vouvray. Good work by the young adults! And you!

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  5. Sounds like such a fun project! And I'm sure it was a delicious match with the wine.

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  6. What fun! And with a world history lesson, to boot. So interesting that the saffron found a kindred spirit with the wine.

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