Sunday, January 31, 2016

Andean Rose Geranium Hot Chocolate with Whipped Coconut Cream #FreshTastyValentines #sponsor #giveaway


For my first event post, I published Love is Dizzying, But Romance Is All About Balance, with a little help from by one of the event sponsors - UncommonGoods. To go along with my Gluten-Free Chocolate Cake with Rose Peppercorn Salted Cream, that I published in the UncommonGoods post, I served tiny mugs of hot chocolate made with Pacari Chocolate.*


Andean Rose Geranium Hot Chocolate 
with Whipped Coconut Cream
Ingredients serves 4
Hot Chocolate
  • 4 C milk (I made mine dairy-free with my homemade hazelnut milk)
  • 1-1/2 C dark chocolate, chopped into pieces
  • 1/2 C Andean Rose Geranium chocolate, chopped into pieces
  • 2-3 T honey, depending on your taste
  • 1 vanilla bean
  • pinch salt (I used a rose peppercorn salt from UncommonGoods)
  • Optional to make it 21+: 1 ounce brandy or tequila
Whipped Coconut Cream
  • 1 can coconut milk (must be a full fat version)
  • 1/2 C organic powdered sugar

Procedure
Whipped Coconut Cream
Chill your coconut milk in the refrigerator overnight. When removing from the fridge, being careful not to shake or tip the can; you want the fat to remain separated from the liquid. Before whipping, place a large mixing bowl in the freezer to chill.

Remove the coconut milk from the fridge. Without tipping or shaking, remove the lid. Scrape out the top, thickened cream and leave the liquid behind. You can use that for something else, so set it aside.


Place cream in your chilled mixing bowl. Beat for with a mixer until creamy. Add powdered sugar. Continue to mix until creamy and smooth. Use immediately or refrigerate.



Hot Chocolate
Place the vanilla bean and salt in a large pot. Pour in the milk and bring to a vigorous simmer. Turn off the heat and let the flavor infuse for 15 minutes. Bring to a simmer again and add in the chocolate pieces so that they're totally submerged. Let stand for 3 minutes. Whisk until the chocolate is melted. Strain into serving mugs.

For adults, add brandy or tequila, if desired. To serve, top the spiced hot chocolate with a dollop of whipped coconut cream.

Giveaway
Don't forget to check out the prizes and enter our #FreshTastyValentines Giveaway
HERE. You can win a prize from Pacari Chocolate!


*Disclosure: I received complimentary product from Pacari Chocolate for the creation of this post. This is a sponsored post that contains affiliate links. Although this post is sponsored, all opinions are my own.*

Find Pacari Chocolate
on the web: here
on Twitter: here
on Facebook: here
on Instagram: here

Today's #FreshTastyValentines Recipes

Love is Dizzying, But Romance Is All About Balance #FreshTastyValentines #sponsor #giveaway

This sponsored post is written by me on behalf of UncommonGoods. All opinions are my own. 

Today is the kick-off for a multi-day, multi-blogger event I coordinated called Fresh Tasty Valentines. How do you feel about Valentines' Day? At almost forty-three years old, it's growing on me. Again.

When I was a kid, Valentines' Day was exhilarating. One year, in elementary school, I remember making all of my Valentines' cards with my mom, taping bubblegum to the cards on which I had painstakingly written - in bubblegum scented pink ink no less - 'Stuck on You!'

Then, in college, I worked as a florist. And my disdain for the holiday was born. I worked at a flower shop because I loved flowers - all those the scents, all those the textures - and I loved creating something beautiful that a fellow flower lover would enjoy. 

But on February 14th, directly proportional to the proximity of dinner time, men would line up for a dozen long-stemmed red roses. It wasn't thoughtful. It wasn't creative. And it certainly wasn't authentic. It was obligatory. 

"How about something a little less common?" I suggested once, reaching for a bunch of fringed parrot tulips that were a sunny yellow bloom tipped in scarlet. The man nearly bit my head off in his impatience. "I just want the long-stem red roses and I'm already late for my damn dinner!" he bellowed. 

How's that for romance? For years after college, I despised Valentines' Day. 

I firmly believe that love and romance belong front and center all the time. Why is February 14th designated as a day for people to show their sweethearts that they are adored? What about the other 364 days?!?

I would rather get a bunch of handpicked wildflowers on a random day in August than a dozen red roses on a day when florists mark up their wares beyond the typical 300% markup. Thankfully all three of my boys know this and I find flowers from the garden in a mason jar on the table when their bushes are in bloom.

A Hand-Picked Rose from My Boys' Garden

I know that I sound unapologetically unromantic. Is there a Valentines' equivalent of a Grinch? That would be me. Would have been me. But one of my boys loves Valentines' Day and spends weeks planning his cards for his classmates; so, we make the cards together. Kinda like my mom did with me. I love that and it's helping to melt my iciness towards the holiday.

I look at it this way: I love my Valentines (my Love and our two boys) 365 days of the year. Why would I refuse to celebrate that affection just because everyone else is celebrating on that same day?!

And, truth be told, I'm not unromantic. I love romance. I just don't reserve romance for February 14th. Jake and I take our romance to the redwoods, on a lake, to the snow, and to the beach. All. Year. Long.

Me and My Valentine

After nearly sixteen years of marriage, and eighteen years together - the most important thing to remember: love is dizzying, but romance is all about balance. So, that is the filter - that it's all about balance - through which I view Valentines' Day now. To that end, I have partnered with UncommonGoods to share a recipe for a romantic date night at home. No need to go out an spend a lot of money, though that can be fun, too!

What to Know About...

UncommonGoods is a company that this laid-back, tree-hugging couple from California's central coast wholeheartedly adores. At the root of the company is an passionate respect for creative individuals. Their business practices are rooted in the belief that they have a responsibility to positively impact the globe.

Watching the sunset on our first trip to Mexico with my parents. May 1999.

Headquartered in Brooklyn, New York, UncommonGoods is a privately-owned retailer whose mission is to shine the spotlight on unique products and handcrafted gifts and provide a sales venue for artists and designers. All of their products are produced without harm to animals or people.

While I have enjoyed every product I've ever received from them - and I've been purchasing from them ever since I heard about them a decade ago - here's what really makes me smile: half of what they sell is handmade, a majority of their products are created right here in the United States; and nearly a third of their entire collection utilizes recycled and/or upcycled materials.

Browse their gifts collections for your sweetheart or for your best girlfriends or yourself.

For this UncommonGoods-sponsored post about Valentines gifts, I am sharing my recipe for the best gift ever: a romantic date night at home.* And I am thrilled that they agreed to sponsor my #FreshTastyValentines online blogging event. They will be giving one of our readers a $150 gift certificate for a shipping spree at their online marketplace. See the rafflecopter at the bottom of this post for more information and to enter. Good luck!

You can browse their Kitchen-Bar collection here to come up with your own combination of things to have a great night in. Like all good recipes, I hope this inspires you to get creative and mix it up!

A Recipe for Romantic Night In: 
It's All About Balance!

Ingredients
  • Your Sweetheart
  • No External Distractions
  • Something He Likes
  • Something You Like
  • optional: a roaring fire, your favorite tunes


Procedure
Your sweetheart: Grab your sweetheart. It doesn't matter if it's in the dining room, the living room, the bedroom, or the backyard. Just be in the same place at the same time with the goal of a little romance.

No external distractions: Shut off all devices. Yes, this is very important! Your sweetheart deserves your undivided attention; and you deserve his. Let the phone calls go to voicemail. This also means that you need to get a babysitter and send the kiddos out for a few hours. Or make a late-night date for after the kids are in bed.

Something He Likes: I affectionately call my sweetheart a 'Sugar Pig!' Actually, I am pretty sure he called himself that once...and it stuck. Though I am more of a savory gal, I had to make something sweet for him.

Also, I am more of a wine-drinker. I will drink beer, but my husband thoroughly enjoys beer. So I decided to host a Valentines Beer Tasting for him.

I love all of the glassware that UncommonGoods sells. From elegant to chunky and austere to themed, it's as fun as it is useful. Check out the glassware collection here. While I was perusing that I found a 13 Piece Beer Tasting Set (here) that was perfect for my plans. I'll post about that date night in soon!

Something You Like: As I said, I'm more of a savory girl. And true confession: my husband hasn't set foot in the kitchen in 18 years. Okay, that's not totally true; he comes in the take out the compost bucket nightly and the garbage whenever it needs emptying. But we do not share cooking duties. I know he must have cooked before he met me, but that was a long time ago. And he probably would cook more, but I'm territorial in the kitchen. 

Since I love to get creative in the kitchen, I wanted to try the Gourmet Island Sugar Set (here) and the Dessert and Baking Salts (here) and work some culinary magic for a date night dessert. The balancing act: it has both sweet and savory and - believe it or not - the ubiquitous Valentines' flower: roses!

Gluten-Free Chocolate Cake
with Rose Peppercorn Salted Cream 

Ingredients makes 6 individual cakes

  • 12 oz. bittersweet chocolate chips or bittersweet chocolate, roughly chopped
  • 1 C butter, cubed
  • 3/4 C organic raw turbinado sugar
  • 1/4 C rum soaked sugar, part of the UncommonGoods Gourmet Island Sugar Set (here)
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 C unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 T whole milk
  • 1 T honey
  • 1/4 t rosewater
  • 1 can coconut milk (chilled overnight)
  • 1/4 C organic powdered sugar
  • rose peppercorn salt for garnish, part of the UncommonGoods Dessert and Baking Salts (here)


Procedure
Preheat oven to 375°F. Grease your baking dishes. I used individual heart-shaped springform pans.

Place chocolate and butter in a bowl over a medium saucepan of water. Over medium low heat, stirring often, melt chocolate with butter until completely blended. Add sugars and mix well. Add eggs one at a time, whisking well after each addition. Stir in milk, honey, and rosewaer. Sift cocoa into bowl and stir until just blended.

Pour batter into prepared pans and bake for 35 to 40 minutes, or until cakes have risen and top has formed a thin crust. The cakes should be just firm in the center when done. Let cool completely.

Open the can of chilled coconut milk and remove only the thickened coconut milk solids. Leave the liquid in the can and use it for another purpose.


Place in a mixing bowl with powdered sugar and beat until stiff peaks form.


To serve, remove cakes from the pans and place on individual serving plates. Top with a dollop of whipped coconut cream. And sprinkle with rose peppercorn salt. Serve immediately.

While we sipped and nibbled the cakes, we made our way through the What I Love About You by Me Book (here).

So, do you see the underlying thread of a romantic night in? Be together. Have fun. That's it!

You can't buy love. But you can certainly find some unique gifts that help in making an evening with your Love more fun. Best. Date. Night. In.

*Disclosure: I received complimentary products, of my choosing, from UncommonGoods for the creation of this post. This is a sponsored post that contains affiliate links. Although this post is sponsored, all opinions are my own.*

Find UncommonGoods
on the web: here
on Twitter: here
on Facebook: here
on Pinterest: here
on Instagram: here
on Google+: here

Enter the #FreshTastyValentines Giveaway
that includes a $150 shopping spree
at UncommonGoods

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

La Mirada Pop-Up Dinner: Carmel Belle's Love Letter to the Sea


Last night, Carmel Belle hosted its third pop-up dinner at the Monterey Museum of Art, La Mirada. And it was, in my estimation, a veritable love letter to the sea. On the walls hung an exhibit of pieces by artist Armin Hansen. Born in San Francisco, Hansen did live in Monterey when it was a budding artist community. I didn't take any photographs - because they were forbidden! - but this one, Nino, was there as were numerous oils, watercolors, and etchings.

http://crockerartmuseum.org/

The variance in the styles of the pieces was dramatic. Without knowing they were the work of one artist, one might think it was a multi-artist exhibit.

But one thing was clear: Hansen loved the sea.

Carmel Belle and Chef Kyle Odell sourced the fish from H&H Fresh Seafood, a sustainable small boat fishery based in Santa Cruz who focuses on a hand-caught, sustainable, one rod-one fish model. Hans Haveman was in attendance and spoke passionately about his mission to sell "wild fish from wild fisherman."

One thing was clear: Hans loves the sea.


Chef Kyle created a four-course menu that included seaweed, fresh ahi, and fresh black cod. One thing was clear: Chef Kyle loves seafood...and knows what to do with it!

first
Honeynut Squash Soup
Toasted Seaweed, Crème Fraîche

"Don't eat this yet," cautioned Carmel Belle owner Jay Dolata as he welcomed guests to the long banquet table. "That's the garnish for the soup."


When we were all seated, Carmel Belle servers made their way around the table and deftly poured the squash soup over our grilled squash and seaweed garnish. There were so many flavors in this soup - richness from the crème fraîche, saltiness from the seaweed, a sweet-smokiness from the grilled honeynut squash, and a silkiness from the charred green onion. Wow. One of the gals said, "I wanted to lick the bowl clean!" If I were at home, I probably would have licked the bowl. It was that tasty.


second
Ahi Tuna & Citrus Salad
Organic Greens, Seared Ahi Tuna, Cara Cara Oranges, Sesame, Scallions, Citrus Vinaigrette


This was probably my favorite course, though that's a tough call to make because all of the courses were so delectable. Crisp greens, seared tuna, and juicy citrus. Yeah, I was in love. And the gals with whom I was sitting commented on liking the family-style plating. We could take as little or as much as we wanted, so there was no waste. And, I'm pretty certain we all had seconds on this one. I was even tempted to take thirds, but I knew we were only halfway through the courses.

third
Roasted Monterey Bay Black Cod
Fennel & Citrus Glaze, Grilled Broccolini, Olive Oil, Mashed Potatoes

Silky smooth mashed potatoes, made with olive oil instead of butter, were the base of the next course: roasted black cod, also called sablefish, and grilled broccolini.


'Buttery,' 'salty,' and 'sweet' were all words that came to mind while eating the black cod. There were so many flavors that melded together. 'Oh, my goodness, I'm stuffed' also came to mind. But that didn't stop me from taking a large piece, devouring it, and nabbing another small piece for a second helping.



fourth
Bearss Lime Tarts
Elderberry Cream, Elderflower Poppyseed Garnish

Finally...though I normally do not eat dessert, two elements of this made it irresistible to me: Bearss lime + elderflower. Those are two of my favorites though I would never have thought to marry those flavors. The crust lent just the right amount of bite, the Bearss lime filling had just the right amount of tang, and the pillow of cream was a dream.


grape juice
Scheid Vineyards

"The grape juice was provided by Scheid Vineyards," read the menu. Always a favorite. We had the choice of the 2012 Pinot Noir and the 2012 Chardonnay. No question which one I picked, right? Given the choice, I'm always a red gal!


The Pinot Noir boasted aromas of blackberries while on the tongue notes of red berries - currant and raspberries - tangoed with subtle notes of cardamom and clove. It was an enjoyable, vibrant wine that paired easily with everything we ate.


Well there you have it. Carmel Belle's Love Letter to the Sea in their third pop-up dinner. What a menu! What a night! Keep your eyes open for news on a the next pop-up. You don't want to miss out and there are only 30 seats around the table.

Sunday, January 24, 2016

Tortellini en Brodo à la Heat for the Foodie Reads 2016 Challange


The Foodie Reads 2016 Challenge is in full swing and the end of our first month is looming. I had never heard of this book, but it was mentioned during an Italian wine twitter chat; I had to get it. Heat by Bill Buford.*


On the Page...
This coming-of-age-in-the-kitchen is a hodgepodge of high-end restaurant gossip (Will Elisa and Gina have a kitchen cat-fight?), kitchen secrets (Though the short ribs at Babbo are billed as Brasato al Barolo, they are not actually braised in Barolo, but in a cheaper varietal Merlot.), and devoted love letter to the quickly disappearing tradition of homemade food.

There's something for everyone. Like melodrama? You'll enjoy the cast of characters in the Babbo kitchen, especially the antics of Marco Pierre White. Like reinvention stories? Us 40 somethings can certainly understand the appeal of reflecting on life and career, not to mention the romance of actually changing course for a new career. Can you say 'mid life crisis?'

The subtitle of the book - An Amateur's Adventures as Kitchen Slave, Line Cook, Pasta-Maker and Apprentice to a Dante-Quoting Butcher in Tuscany -  previews the chapters. Buford begins as a kitchen slave in Mario Batali's restaurant, mercilessly chopping carrots for hours and re-chopping when his are found to be the wrong dimension. Then he graduates to line cook. More drama.

But it's the chapters Pasta-Maker and Apprentice that tease out his complete devotion to learning about food. Buford goes to Porretta to learn how to make pasta in Betta's kitchen. I myself learned to cook in Italy, after I graduated from college, so that food sensibility is burned into my brain: slow and handmade. The Slow Food Movement did begin in Italy after all. I loved reading about his time in Italy. It made me homesick for Rome. Mi manchi tantissimo, Bella Roma!

In the Bowl...
It just so happens that I am taking an artisan pasta class this month. And this week we made tortellini and ravioli casalinga. Click for that recipe post. I decided to use my tortellini from class for a Betta-esque dish. I say a Betta-esque dish versus a Batali-esque dish because, as Betta tells Buford, "Mario did not learn to make tortellini when he was here."

Oh, about casalinga, Buford explains: "Italians have a word, casalinga, homemade, although its primary sense is 'made by hand.' My theory is just a variant of casalina (Small food: by hand and therefore precious, hard to find. Big food: from a factory and therefore cheap, abundant.) Just about every preparation I learned in Italy was handmade and involved my learning how to use my own hands differently." pg. 300


Ingredients
  • 1 C diced onions
  • 1 C diced carrots
  • 1 C diced celery
  • olive oil
  • 2 C chopped chard, rinsed well
  • 8 C chicken stock
  • handful of tortellini per person (click for my tortellini casalinga)
  • freshly ground salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 C fresh chopped herbs (I used parsley, thyme, and oregano)
  • grated parmesan cheese for grating and serving


Procedure
In a large souppot, cook he onions, carrots, and celery in a splash of olive oil until softened. Pour in the stock and bring to a boil over medium heat. Stir in the chard and look till just wilted. Season with salt and pepper, and stir in tortellini. Cook until the tortellini float to the top. Remove from heat. Stir in the herbs. Ladle into individual serving bowls and serve hot with parmesan on the side.

*This blog currently has a partnership with Amazon.com in their affiliate program, which gives me a small percentage of sales if you buy a product through a link on my blog. It doesn't cost you anything more. If you are uncomfortable with this, feel free to go directly to Amazon.com and search for the item of your choice.

     

Here's what everyone else is reading this month: January 2016 Foodie Reads Challenge.

Thursday, January 21, 2016

Artisan Pasta Class: Tequila Sunrise Tortellini and Ravioli


Last night at the artisan pasta class I'm taking we made three colors of dough and laminated them together. Then we cut the dough and made tortellini and ravioli.


Filling Ingredients 
from America's Test Kitchen
  • 3/4 C frozen chopped spinach, defrosted and drained
  • 2 T butter
  • 1/2 small onion, minced (approximately 1/4 C)
  • kosher salt
  • 1 C ricotta cheese
  • 3/4 C grated parmesan cheese
  • 1 egg yolk


Filling Procedure
Heat butter in a small skillet. Add onions and cook until translucent, approximately 5 minutes. Stir in the spinach. Salt to taste and cook for another minute.

Transfer spinach mixture to a medium mixing bowl. Stir in remaining ingredients. Adjust seasonings to preference. Set aside.

Tortellini Procedure
Roll the dough to a thinness of 5 of 6 on the pasta machine. Cut out circles and spray with lightly with water. Place a small portion - maybe 1/2 teaspoon if your circle is 2" in diameter - of the filling in the center of the circle. Bring the edges of the circle together to form a semi-circle.


Working around the edge, press out any extra air and create a seal around the filling.Bring the two pointed edges together, wrapping them around your finger. Press them firmly together. Gently shape the tortellini however you wish; I pull the rounded lip away from the center. Place the finished tortellini on a floured parchment-lined cookie sheet.


Ravioli Procedure
Roll the dough to a thinness of 5 of 6 on the pasta machine. Lay the dough on a floured cutting board. Place a mound of filling on the dough and spray the entire surface with water.


Fold the dough over the top  and press out any extra air to create a seal around the filling.


Using a ravioli cutter, cut around the filling carefully. 



Place the finished ravioli on a floured parchment-lined cookie sheet.


To cook these: drop them into salted, boiling water. Cook for four to five minutes. Gently remove them from the post and fold them into a sauce.

*This blog currently has a partnership with Amazon.com in their affiliate program, which gives me a small percentage of sales if you buy a product through a link on my blog. It doesn't cost you anything more. If you are uncomfortable with this, feel free to go directly to Amazon.com and search for the item of your choice.


      

Artisan Pasta Class: Laminated Dough


Last night at my artisan pasta class, we made a trio of doughs that looked like a Tequila Sunrise  - a basic dough with a slightly golden hue, a beet dough that was beautifully rosy and pink, and a red pepper dough that was sort of a saffron orange. So gorgeous!

Then we laminated them together.


Procedure
Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper and flour it liberally. Cut each dough ball into quarters and wrap the piece you aren't using in plastic.

One quarter at a time, roll the dough through the machine. Using the widest setting, form a tongue and press it through the machine. Fold the dough into thirds and run it through again. Fold the dough in thirds one more time and run it through. Lay that on the floured parchment and repeat with the different colors. Before laying the next dough on top of the pile, spritz it with water and gently press the doughs together. At the end, your dough stack will look like this.


Trim the uneven edges of the dough and set aside. You should have a long rectangle. Cut the rectangle in half and stack the halves on top of each other like this. Wrap dough in plastic and refrigerate for at least 15 minutes.


After the dough has chilled, slice 1/2" pieces from the stack and run it though the pasta machine. 


The next recipe post will should you what we did with this beautifully striated, laminated dough. Stay tuned!

*This blog currently has a partnership with Amazon.com in their affiliate program, which gives me a small percentage of sales if you buy a product through a link on my blog. It doesn't cost you anything more. If you are uncomfortable with this, feel free to go directly to Amazon.com and search for the item of your choice.

Artisan Pasta Class: Tequila Sunrise Pasta Doughs


Last night was my second artisan pasta class with Jenn, the Culinary Arts guru at a local high school and friend from college. Remember the first session when we made Hand-Rolled, Hand-Cut Spinach Papardelle?

Yesterday we made 3 different pasta doughs and laminated them together - basic dough, pink beet dough, and red pepper dough. Jenn jokingly called it a 'Tequila Sunrise' dough when we laminated it all together. So pretty!

On another note: I am blown away by how quickly you can put a dough together with a food processor. I don't have any space in my cabinets for one, but- wow! - I'm impressed.

Basic Pasta Dough
adapted from Making Artisan Pasta (my review of that cookbook here)

Ingredients
  • 350 g pasta flour
  • 3 eggs, room temperature
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2 to 3 T tepid water

Roasted Red Pepper Pasta Dough

Ingredients
  • 350 g pasta flour
  • 2 ounces red pepper puree
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 T sweet red paprika
Beet Pasta Dough

Ingredients
  • 275 g pasta flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 C beet puree
Procedure 
The procedure was the same of all of the doughs, so I am only writing it down once.

Place all of the dry ingredients in the body of the food processor. Add the wet ingredients. Pulse until it comes together in a ball. Turn the dough onto a floured cutting board and knead until smooth and elastic, approximately 5 minutes. Wrap the dough in plastic and let rest for 30 minutes at room temperature.

After 30 minutes, you're ready to laminate them together. Stay tuned for that recipe post!

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Carmel Belle Pop-Up at La Mirada Coming Up!!

If you've been following me for awhile, you know my complete and utter adoration of pop-up dinners.

Seriously, take a great chef and host a dinner in a new venue, or at least a different kind of cuisine, and - voilà! - instant fun. We've met new friends, celebrated with old friends, had family date nights, and enjoyed romantic date nights at pop-ups all around the bay.


Last February, Jake and I went to the inaugural collaborative pop-up dinner between Carmel Belle and Monterey Museum of Art, La Mirada. It was The Perfect Friday Night. Here's a shot of Chef Kyle Odell serving a dish that evening.


Then, last September, Carmel Belle was back at the La Mirada; Jake and I went for their Autumn Pop-up. Here's a shot of the menu from that evening. I still think about that food!


I just heard that they are planning a new one and there are only a dozen tickets left.

Chef Kyle will be cooking up a seafood dinner inspired by the current exhibit at the La Mirada, Armin Hansen: The Artful Voyage.  They are sourcing the fish from H&H Seafood, a sustainable small boat fishery based in Santa Cruz.  The food will be paired with wines from Scheid Vineyards.   

If you're interested in food and art, take a look - purchase tickets here. It's next Tuesday, January 26th, from 6:30pm to 9pm. I'll be going. If you're local, join me!

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